Tag Archives: PR

Uber’s 3 PR Tips For Law Firms: #DeleteUber & Why “Trending” Isn’t Always A Good Thing

Yesterday was a PR nightmare for Uber (and a political one for Republicans).

New York City’s yellow cabs were showing solidarity with opponents to Trump’s executive order targeting people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.

But, just as the drivers licensed from the Taxi & Limousine Commission halted rides to John F. Kennedy airport, Uber decided to lower its fees for commuters.

It’s hard to say if this was just poor timing or a creep on cabby market share, but Uber’s decision to continue to pick up passengers at JFK felt immediate backlash.

Shortly thereafter, on Twitter, #DeleteUber started to trend.

New Yorkers were supportive of the taxi drivers’ decision to host a one-hour strike in protest of the policy. After all, many of their employees are immigrants from the nations being targeted by the travel ban; and, many New Yorkers are, too.

“Honestly, it was really touching to see how many people stood up for our strike,” alliance director Bhrairavi Desai said to the NY Daily News.

“Uber is a Wall Street darling. We’ve never had illusions that it operates on Main Street.”

Then, Lyft—a direct Uber competitor—announced it would donate $1 million to the ACLU, which commanded the fight to free detainees (via CNBC). Eventually, Uber tried to set the record straight about not wanting to break the stike. The company even pledged $3 million toward a legal defense fund to cover legal expenses associated with the ban. Nevertheless, damage was done to Uber’s reputation. Some might call their actions, too little too late.

Don’t let #DeleteUber happen to you. Here are three PR pitfalls your law firm should watch out for.

  1. Pretending Your Firm Is Immune to Client Feedback. Your firm is in the services game whether you like it or not.

Law firms, like taxis, are accountable to clients. Ultimately, firms offer legal services—“services” being the operative word. In service industries, it is crucial to address customers directly. Communicate with them via Twitter and social media. Be sensitive to their whims.

Find out through surveys or direct communication what type of action, pay schedule, or social justice a client may want. And, even when it costs you money, do it. Paying up front to accommodate a single, needy client will result in client referrals and positive client feedback. Damage done by a negative review can lead to an irreversible negative reputation.

  1. Believing More Publicity Is Good Publicity. You’re not a celebrity or socialite. IN law, publicity is not always good publicity.

Uber was already facing a dubious reputation in New York. Now, it might have given market share over to its chief rival (and litigant). Sometimes law firms want to stay under the radar when it comes to cases—even ones with successful outcomes.

Carefully curate your public image. A groundswell of negative public attention can quickly take over thanks to social media.

  1. Employing Hands-off PR Strategies. PR agencies should not shoulder all the responsibility and work involved in creating a positive image for your firm. Partners and associates must all chip in when it comes to managing the PR poker game.

Uber should have immediately ceased operations at JFK. It should have considered donating money to a legal fund directly benefiting employees of the Taxi & Limousine Commission who went on strike.

Employing third-party consultants does not exempt attorneys from speaking to the press or representing their firm. A PR person is not a substitute for a well-spoken (and sometimes apologetic) law partner.

Richard Levick, President of Levick Strategy Communications, writes of law firm PR strategy:

“Reporters are like stray cats –if you don’t feed them, they go to someone else’s door. Call them back first, even if it is to say that you can’t say anything. Reporters remember who calls them and who doesn’t. Not returning the journalist’s call today, no matter what the reason, guarantees that you won’t get the call when you do want to be in the paper.”

Need more help crafting the right message to your employees and clients? Check out the Center for Competitive Management’s Legal Services training webinars here.

Because in today’s powerful social media world, “trending”—like #DeleteUber—isn’t always a good thing.

-WB

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Is The Future Bright For Non-Blogging Law Firms?

Your firm may think that it’s above e-gossip or online blogging. But, that’s also what renown law firm K&L Gates thought before its dispute with online reporter, Law360.

Above The Law writer, David Lat, describes the incident with an excerpt from the Law360 piece in his article, “Barbarians at the K&L Gates.”

“Flat profits and spreading concern about the firm’s ability to keep talent are among the reasons more than 80 partners have K&L Gates LLP since the beginning of the year, an exodus that includes many up-and-coming leaders who had been seen as key to the firm’s future, according to some partners who recently left and other experts,” quotes Lat on July 23, 2015.

“Those leaving the 2,000-lawyer firm include rising partners in prized corporate and financial practices and a number of high-profile veterans, including intellectual property litigation heavyweight Michael Bettinger [who moved to Sidley in San Francisco]. Litigators Greg Jackson and Danny Ashby joined veteran Steve Korotash, a former U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission associate director, in a jump to Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP’s white-collar group in Dallas in March.”

Although K&L Gates Chair Peter Kalis was quickly ready to refute this depiction of his business—a depiction that also made its way into a Blomberg article—Kalis lacked an online presence. He and his firm were at a disadvantage in spreading their side of the story.

Notorious legal blogger Kevin O’Keefe followed up with his own Above The Law post titled, “Non-Blogging Law Firm Managing Partners And CEOs Playing With Fire?” in which he writes, “[a] memo leaked to Above The Law and Kalis spoke to Bloomberg on July 29th for a July 30th piece reporting that the partner departures were a natural result of the firm’s strategy.”

“I can’t help but see the irony in Kalis calling for everyone at K&L to take a stand in the media when neither he nor they have an effective media presence. Where’s their voice?”

And that’s the problem with being a Luddite in law. The most efficient and effective way to defend your firm’s image and, by proxy, your clients is the world wide web. After all, it’s in the name, the audience is world-wide.

Perhaps you already host a law firm blog but your posts don’t seem to go anywhere. Delivery mechanisms are equally important to social media.

Here are a few tips on how to get your content shared. But, beware, with every benefit to technology comes certain pitfalls of which your firm should be weary.

1. Publish your posts on media aggregators.

Websites like Reddit, Shoutwire, and Digg allow individuals to submit links to websites, blog posts, or any Internet-based page. The community of readers then votes up (or down) the link based on a review of its content. Create flashy titles and you’ll likely see in a flash the rise of your readership.

Beware: Comments by readers can be harsh. The anonymity of the Internet allows people to write down criticisms (NSFW) that may end up permanently cached on the World Wide Web.

2. Add website sharing buttons.

Your firm’s website should have links to all of your social media accounts, as well as ways to share your posts. Programs like “Click to Tweet” make this easy.

Beware: Your firm may need a small amount of Internet savvy to create buttons on your website and restore broken links.

3. Create interesting content.

This is so obvious your firm is likely already doing it! Nevertheless, remember to write thoughtful arguments accompanied with eye-catching photos. There’s so much competition already when it comes to online content, your firm’s additions must stand out.

Beware: Yes, this requires a little more time and thought to write captivating posts and tweets.

4. Do your research.

If you know what time your readers are log on then you’ll know the best time to publish your posts. Maybe you’re getting a lot of hits first thing in the morning. People are remiss to start work at 8am and decide to read legal news or browse the web. With this knowledge, you can now set your social media to publish at certain times to target your audience.

Beware: Due diligence on your casework is no longer enough. Time to do due diligence on your business development, too.

5. Crossover multiple social media platforms.

Happy you finally mastered the art of blogging for your firm? Time to summarize that blog post on your LinkedIn and Facebook page and compile a 140-character hook for your Twitter account. Don’t be afraid to repeat the same ideas on different mediums.

Beware: Now you’ll have to memorize more usernames and passwords. More social media means more potential backlash.

In the end, it’s possible to circulate your firm’s strategy about hiring, firing, and work ethic before a biased, and certainly less-informed secondary source scoops you.

Start small by using the above tips to get your firm’s content shared on social media.

Last tip: proofread, never post when emotional or angry, and generally be sure it’s content that your firm truly wants shared.

The question for organizations is how do you use these tools to open up communications with your workers, candidates and customers, while protecting your reputation as an organization?

Attend C4CM’s course, “Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter: Developing a Successful Social Media Employer Branding Strategy.“

If you’re looking for tips on communication practices in the workplace, read C4CM’s guide “Communication Skills for Managers: Tips, Techniques, and Best Practice Strategies to Communicate More Effectively.“

Applying successful communication techniques gives you two important advantages: (1) You’ll create a harder-working and more productive employee workforce, and (2) you’ll be less likely to fall into the clutches of employee lawsuits.

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Snapchat’s Sleight Of Hand & Lessons In PR For Law Firms

Like a magician sleight of hand trick, Snapchat founders CEO Evan Spiegel and CTO Bobby Murphy settled its contentious lawsuit quietly while Apple was announcing its new iPhone launch.

Former fraternity brother and alleged cofounder Reggie Brown had sued the dynamic duo, claiming he developed the initial idea for the app, according to Forbes. And while Snapchat has just raised funds leaving its valuation at a whopping $10 billion, the company had much wealth at stake.

This is just one of the many lawsuits facing app-building billionaires. One of Tinder’s creators, Whitney Wolfe, also settled a lawsuit, although its terms are highly confidential, according to Forbes.

As for Snapchat’s admission? Spiegel smartly said (via Forbes):

“We are pleased that we have been able to resolve this matter in a manner that is satisfactory to Mr. Brown and the Company. We acknowledge Reggie’s contribution to the creation of Snapchat and appreciate his work in getting the application off the ground.”

Certainly no big surprised in that statement. Nor any doubt shed on the success of the company, itself, admit such controversy.

If there’s one thing these companies understand, it’s that image matters most. So, while the world was looking toward iPhones and iWatches, entrepreneurs were putting out litigious, fictitious fires.

For law firms, this is the best outcome for a client. However, sometimes image problems emerge regarding firm wrongdoing. Hiring a smart public relations firm may be as valuable as gaining new clients for equity partners.

Law firms—like any private company—experience a fair share of litigation. Whether it’s a dispute filed by a former employee, accidental release of confidential client information, or compliance issues, online news these days breaks faster than cold glass in hot water.

And your firm will be in hot water if it’s not prepared.

Richard Levick, President of Levick Strategy Communications, writes of law firm PR strategy:

“Reporters are like stray cats –if you don’t feed them, they go to someone else’s door. Call them back first, even if it is to say that you can’t say anything. Reporters remember who calls them and who doesn’t. Not returning the journalist’s call today, no matter what the reason, guarantees that you won’t get the call when you do want to be in the paper.”

A PR person does not substitute for a well-spoken (and sometimes apologetic) law partner. But, law partners may need to consult a PR professional before he or she can become well-spoken.

Reduce the risk of malpractice claims (and the need for a PR firm!) by listening to C4CM’s webinar: “Drafting Ethical, Effective Engagement Letters that Reduce Firm Liability and Improve Client Relationships.”

It will address:

  • The five key components every engagement letter should include,
  • How to use engagement letters as tools to substantially reduce firm risk, and
  • Why well-drafted engagement letters are vital to improving client relationships.

Why? Because when risk managers audit a law practice for the risk of legal malpractice, the first item they pull from the file is the engagement letter. This one document is the most reliable indicator of whether a law practice has in place systems that can effectively reduce the risks of malpractice claims.

So follow Snapchat’s lead, and while the world is temporarily distracted looking one way, address your potentially problematic PR issues today.

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Save It, Shred It, Delete It? Record Retention Practice Dos & Don’ts!

Well, this is embarrassing.

A Naples, Florida, property developer has apparently misplaced some important documents. So, they’re offering a $1 million reward to recover them.

What’s worth $1 million to developer Jack Antaramian? Accounting ledgers and books, including subcontractor bids,” related to the construction of his nearly 20-acre resort project in downtown Naples, reports Bloomberg Businessweek.

Ok…that does seem important!

A year ago when the company first discovered the missing documents, a reward was set at just $10,000.  Today, obviously, the need is much higher to recover them.

The project has come in over budget and took seven months longer than expected to complete, reports Bloomberg.

What’s worse, the matter has now been slowed down with lawsuits pending against the contractor, Manhattan Construction (then Kraft Construction Co.), by Antaramian’s family partnership since February 2010 for breach of contract. Antaramian wants to see where all the money has slipped away to since being advanced by a bank loan, which ended up foreclosing.

Yes, this is quite a mess. Without those financial documents, Antaramian can’t conduct the financial audit he’s looking for to close his lawsuit.

And, offering a reward for the information seems like, in addition to reactivating the lawsuit and suing his other partners in the project, according to Antaramian, “is the only remedy we can think of right now.”

The problem for Antaramian started when the files he wants to see for his financial audit weren’t transferred when his company moved offices in Naples. The contract with Manhattan Construction required them to keep records from subcontractors for three years after final payment, which they did not.

For law firms, the hazards of moving offices, identity theft, technological changes, and potential litigation all impact record-keeping in a big way. It’s easy to believe that law firms might suffer from a similar mishap by misplacing client records—in addition to their own books.

One of a law firm manager’s primary responsibilities is to maintain personnel records, for example. But what began as putting important files in a folder has developed into a complex web of compliance. And each year, compliance gets more and more difficult, as you add in electronic documents and other formats.

There are the modified FMLA rules, the updated ADA regulations, the FLSA, and the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, all of which have separate rigid requirements for retention. And the federal push for I-9 compliance means employers must have their immigration forms meticulously maintained.

Ask yourself, do you have a good document management system?

Have you established clear rules and regulations for which employees have access to which files, including a secure separation between I-9 forms or grievance complaints and an employee’s personnel file, for example?

Does your file management system have secure password protection or other security systems to ensure its confidentiality?

Do you have a back-up system in case something is lost?

Do you have a secondary back-up system in case both systems and back-ups are destroyed?

If you’ve answered “no” or are even uncertain about the answer for any of these questions, chances are your file management system is deficient and you risk major consequences to a compliance audit.

Numerous malpractice claims have been filed as a result of lost or misplaced documents. These mistakes could have been prevented with a properly organized file management system for both internal firm documents and client records.

The American Bar Association offers some basic guidance, such as a file organization checklist, to help avoid these conflicts here.

If your company’s personnel records were audited right this very minute, could they stand-up to a DOL probe, an EEOC investigation, or an ICE inspection?

If not, consider listening to The Center for Competitive Management (C4CM)’s detailed audio conference on Wednesday, July 23, 2913, from 2:00pm EST to 3:15PM EST called, “Save it, Shred it, Delete it? Employee Record Retention for HR.”

With your registration to this conference, you’ll also receive C4CM’s top-selling guide, Record Retention Compliance & Best Practices—a $249 value—free of charge.

That’s certainly better than having to pay $1 million in reward money to recover your records.

What’s the price of losing paperwork? Millions. The publicity shame is causes? Priceless.

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Social Media For Law Firms: How To Get Your Content Out There!

So, you’re a law firm manager and you’ve finally got on board with using social media to promote your firm’s services, to evolve with the technological times, and to attract new employees and clients.

Of course, it’s difficult to constantly update your LinkedIn account, Twitter feeds, and blog posts, but you’ve assigned associates for each task and are feeling confident about the endeavor.

The problem is, how do you get people to actually read it?

There are many strategies for increasing the readership of your online legal content—from increasing your number of Twitter followers to increasing the number of website hits by new users.

Here are a few tips on how to get your content shared, and the upsides and downsides of each idea:

1. Publish your posts on media aggregators.

Upside: Websites like Reddit, Shoutwire, and Digg allow individuals to submit links to websites, blog posts, or any Internet-based page. The community of readers then votes up (or down) the link based on a review of its content. Create flashy titles and you’ll likely see in a flash the rise of your readership.

Downside: Comments by readers can be harsh. The anonymity of the Internet allows people to write down criticisms (NSFW) that may end up permanently cached on the World Wide Web.

2. Add website sharing buttons.

Upside: Your firm’s website should have links to all of your social media accounts, as well as ways to share your posts. Programs like “Click to Tweet” make this easy.

Downside: Your firm may need a small amount of Internet savvy to create buttons on your website and restore broken links.

3. Create interesting content.

Upside: This is so obvious your firm is likely already doing it! Nevertheless, remember to write thoughtful arguments accompanied with eye-catching photos. There’s so much competition already when it comes to online content, your firm’s additions must stand out.

Downside: Yes, this requires a little more time and thought to write captivating posts and tweets.

4. Do your research.

Upside: If you know what time your readers are log on then you’ll know the best time to publish your posts. Maybe you’re getting a lot of hits first thing in the morning. People are remiss to start work at 8am and decide to read legal news or browse the web. With this knowledge, you can now set your social media to publish at certain times to target your audience.

Downside: Due diligence on your casework is no longer enough. Time to do due diligence on your business development, too.

5. Crossover multiple social media platforms.

Upside: Happy you finally mastered the art of blogging for your firm? Time to summarize that blog post on your LinkedIn and Facebook page and compile a 140-character hook for your Twitter account. Don’t be afraid to repeat the same ideas on different mediums.

Downside: Now you’ll have to memorize more usernames and passwords. More social media means more potential backlash.

In the end, it’s possible to get your firm’s name and reputation out there.

But, just be careful what your wish for. The New York Police Department (NYPD) recently tried to increase its social media presence to interact with its target audience (“the people”). Instead of wielding the hashtag to promote its officers, however, the NYPD received a top-5 trending Twitter bashtag.

The Assciated Press (via NPR) reports:

“The nation’s largest police force learned the hard way that there are legions online devoted to short-circuiting even the best-intentioned public relations campaign—in this case, the NYPD’s Twitter invitation to people to post feel-good photos of themselves posing with New York’s Finest.

What #myNYPD got instead was a montage of hundreds of news images of baton-wielding cops arresting protesters, pulling suspects by the hair, unleashing pepper spray and taking down a bloodied 84-year-old man for jaywalking.”

So, use the above tips to get your firm’s content shared on social media. Just be sure it’s content that you truly want shared.


The question for organizations is how do you use these tools to open up communications with your workers, candidates and customers, while protecting your reputation as an organization? Attend C4CM’s course, “Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter: Developing a Successful Social Media Employer Branding Strategy.

If you’re looking for tips on communication practices in the workplace, read C4CM’s guide “Communication Skills for Managers: Tips, Techniques, and Best Practice Strategies to Communicate More Effectively.

Applying successful communication techniques gives you two important advantages: 1)You’ll create a harder-working and more productive employee workforce, and 2) you’ll be less likely to fall into the clutches of employee lawsuits.

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Lawyers: Most Hated Profession Or Public Relations Problem?

Lawyers have been vilified for their professional choices since the Middle Ages; and the number of lawyer jokes has tripled since the 1960s. But, over fifty years later, lawyers are at a new low.

A 2013 study finds we’re a lot closer to fulfilling Shakespeare’s famous wish: “The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers.” (William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2)

At least, that’s what a recent article by legal blog Above the Law would have us believe,

Above the Law reminds readers that not only are lawyers the most depressed among professionals, they are also the most despised. Which one of the two came first, we may never know.

But, Above the Law does bring much needed attention to an excerpt from the latest Pew Research Center survey on professional public esteem:

“While there have been modest declines in public appreciation for several occupations, the order of the ratings is roughly the same as it was in 2009. Among the 10 occupations the survey asked respondents to rate, lawyers are at the bottom of the list. About one-in-five Americans (18%) say lawyers contribute a lot to society, while 43% say they make some contribution; fully a third (34%) say lawyers contribute not very much or nothing at all.”

In 2009, one in four people agreed lawyers do “a lot” for society’s well being. Today, in 2013, we’ve lost a man. Now, only one and five can say the same thing.

Luckily, lawyers will still find advocates among their own kind. Staci Zaretsky, esquire, and author of the article “Lawyers: The Most Despised Profession in America,” points out:

“If you don’t think lawyers have contributed to society, take a look at the desegregated school you or your children attended. Go register for a concealed-carry permit in a state that once restricted their issuance. Attend a same-sex marriage and bask in the newlyweds’ joy. Burn a flag. Watch a film with a sex scene at the movies. Protest at the funeral of a soldier who gave his life for America.

Do you enjoy any of these things? If so, then reconsider your thoughts on the most despised profession in America.”

However, lawyers should consider doing more. More, that is, to relate to the public and reform the image of the legal profession. With little persuasion, people could be reminded of all the beneficial acts contributed to this country by lawyers.

After all, 25 of the 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence were lawyers—the results of which we all celebrated on the 4th of July.

Yes, teachers, doctors, and the clergy may get more positive face-time on television, but law firms can also orchestrate publicity for their acts of goodwill and charity. Whether it’s hiring a public relations professional or simply beefing up your firm’s website, it’s important to highlight those winning cases.

Reputation is important for gaining clients. PR enhances the image of your firm, but also reinforces what most Americans already know (deep, deep, deep down): that lawyers are looking to uphold rights and liberties of men and women, not restrict them.

In fact, brand loyalty is key in retaining clients. Create a brand people love, and business follows.

To increase your visibility and positive image, utilize social media. Participate in trending hash-tags on Twitter. Participate in hot legal debates and post answers to your clients’ most common questions. Include quirky and endearing profiles of your associates online. Personalize your practice.

Perhaps lawyers are misunderstood because they’re one of the few professions who still lacks a digital voice.

It may be too late to turnaround the image of lawyers as a whole, but it’s not too late to turnaround the image of your firm. And if, one by one, partners take control over their public image, it won’t take much for the health and well being of society (and your firm) to continue.

-WB

Need help? C4CM is there for your firm providing training resources and recordings essential to law firm management. Learn how to limit toxic workplace talk, improve efficiency, and navigate you most complicated Excel questions here.

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How To Manage Your Law Firm’s Reputation Like A Fine Wine

The Judgment of Paris sounds like a dramatic WWII movie.

But, the only battle in the Judgment of Paris was between bottles of wine. It was, of course, neck to neck.

On May 24, 1976, a British wine merchant Steven Spurrier organized a wine competition in Paris. French judges, in addition to carrying the weight of the world’s best wine producers on their shoulders, carried out two blind tasting comparisons.

After high-quality Chardonnays and then red wines (Bordeaux from France and Cabernet Sauvignon from California). To the surprise of all, a California wine rated best in each category.

Soon the names of American regions Napa and Sonoma, including their wines, were on the tip of everybody’s tongues. Prices for California wines skyrocked and bottles shot off the shelves.

One win can mean everything for your reputation.

Reputation can make or break the bank for law firms. Establishing your business as high-quality, hardworking, and consistent is difficult. New firms lack in legitimacy and experience while incumbent firms find it difficult to change their longstanding reputation.

“Reputations have a strong geographic component,” says Ed Wesemann for Edge International Review.

“A business that is a household name with a strong reputation may never have been heard of in any other.”

Vinyards, like American wines vs. French ones, are also handicapped by their location.

For example, in an old potato field off the highway in New Jersey, Lou Caracciolo planted his first grapes. He was ready to bring the Judgment of Paris to the east coast of New England. He even crafted his cellar in an authentic European style.

Unfortunately, Lou Caracciolo is not a first mover in the market. And, New Jersey has already seen vinyards dating back to prohibition. New Jersey style wine is fruity to a fault. Overly sweet, New Jersey wine is low-cost and low-brow.

Next door, Lou Caracciolo is trying to fight this reputation.

He wants to sell dry, French-tasting wines in an area off the map for those in the market for high-quality, refined, and expensive wine products.

This is an economic phenomenon called a collection action problem, explains NPR Planet Money. Sometimes your rivals make your reputation.

So how does Lou and law firms get out of this reputation glut?

Choose a new marketing scheme. Lou Caracciolo markets his wine as “outter coastal plain.” That is, after all, also south Jersey. Next, he officially certified this region as an officiall wine-cultivating area (“viticultural area”), according to U.S. rules and regulations.

Next, create a public voice.

For Lou Caracciolo, it is important that the public taste his wine to understand its depth and quality. He started a campaign to build reputation and prestige off sales pitches and in-person sales operations.

Law firms should consider writing an official Public Relations (PR) policy and hiring a PR rep. With law firm websites, media coverage of cases, and social media abreast, it’s important that the public view your law firm according to the principles and standards it espouses.

As a start-up law firm building its reputation, don’t be afraid to offer contingency fees for new clients. For particularly high-profile cases, a win may not lead to high rents, but it will likely yield a higher reputation to attract prospective clients.

For incumbent firms, manage your new reputation or reframe your old one through meticulous public profiling. Don’t let rumors of embezzlement, severe layoffs, office closings, or lawsuits against the firm spin out of control.

Manage the external communication, internal communication, and media statements that reach the ears of your clients and society at large. Meticulously plan your internal policies to increase productivity. And, refuse to permit rivals—their poor standards or reputation—to determine your future.

Of course, in a blind test, quality matters more than reputation. Nevertheless, since only justice (not potential clients) is blind: beware of sour grapes.

-WB


Listen to the full story of Lou Caracciolo and his wine on NPR’s podcast Planet Money.

Employee lawsuits are the worst kind of publicity for law firms. When tough conversations are poorly managed, problems fester, productivity plummets, and your risk for an employee lawsuit increases.

Introducing, Handling Difficult Conversations: Communication Strategies for the Workplace– your practical, hands-on guide to managing the most challenging employee and management conversations that may just save your reputation.

This information-packed, 108-page guide provides practical and realistic solutions for tackling the hardest elements of workplace interactions, including:

  • Job Performance
  • Disciplinary Action
  • Termination of Employment
  • Employee Complaints about the Workplace
  • Disabilities (Related to Job Accommodations)
  • Personal Presentation/Hygiene

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