Tag Archives: associates

Why Your Firm Should Fear Legal StartUps & How To Compete

Millennials, the group of tech-toting, flip-flop wearing adults born after 1980, have been the subject of eye-rolling. They’ve been stereotyped as expecting rewards just for participating and believing that spending long hours at the office is overrated.

Yet, legal professionals say that depiction as applied to their younger colleagues is wrong. In fact, they may work differently, taking full advantage of technology, but they’re smart and productive.

In fact, that may be why many of these young graduates interested in law are not going into law firms, at all. Millennials are forming legal start-ups that compete with both small and large, established firms in different ways.

In terms of small-firm competition, small start-up legal services companies can’t rely on a longstanding, loyal client base. Usually they must drive business, and small firms and start-ups will thus be competing among the same pool of potential customers.

Solo practitioners be wary, as well. New ideas, better comprehension of modern technology and a young mindset are assets to these start-up firms looking to represent similar start-ups in the business environment.

Take a look at your millennial competition:

1. Willing

“Founded by Eliam Medina and Rob Dyson, and backed by some of the biggest names in Silicon Valley like Y Combinator, 500 Startups and Ashton Kutcher, Willing is looking not only to change trust and estates, but the entire death care industry. Willing lets your write a will for free in five minutes, plan your funeral and after life and then connects you with the right vendors,” reports Above The Law.

“Is Willing even a legal tech company, or are they simply using a free, automated legal service — will writing — as a way to get customers?”

Well, it’s not the first time that free services have been used to bait and hook customers on related paid services. It’s a tried and true business model, so firms beware.

2. UpCounsel

How does it work? Clients answer a few questions about their legal needs, get connected to relevant attorneys who make a proposal and budget, and then interact online to complete your case.

“Matt Faustman at UpCounsel is convinced that the law firm model is going to change and he just raised a cool $10M from Menlo Ventures to prove it,” wrote Above The Law.

There’s a lot to be said for a system that makes it easier and—ah hem—pleasant to work with a lawyer.

The two examples above (get more here) explain why small or solo-practice law firms might fear the new legal kids on the block, but what do large law firms have to lose?

Properly incentivizing and compensating this new generation of lawyers is essential for your firm’s profitability, retention and key to attracting like-minded clients. When you’re losing key talent to start-ups due to hourly flexibility, superior work-life balance, or other compensation, it’s time to pay attention.

With all this venture capital and private equity money being thrown around to legal services start-ups, don’t be surprised if millennials follow the (dollar) bill.

What can you do? Consider:

  • Specific non-monetary rewards that are certain to improve job satisfaction (flexible leave or work-at-home policies, for example)
  • Tiered compensation for new associates
  • Alternative compensation models (i.e., anything except the traditional partnership model, such as including first-year associates in the profit-sharing)
  • Reward achievements, not simply hours for attorneys at every level

Need more specific ideas? Take the Center for Competitive Management’s webinar “Compensating Millennial Associates: Customizing Compensation and Rewards for Increased Productivity and Firm Profitability,” on Thursday, October 8, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:15 PM Eastern.

This information-packed webinar explores real-life methods for embracing the goals, expectations and ambitions of today’s millennial associates, and how to ‘meet in the middle’ when it comes to compensating this new generation.

Plus, in just 75 minutes, you will learn:

  • Surprising attitudes millennial lawyers have about total compensation
  • Who millennial lawyers are, and how they differ from other generations in terms of pay
  • Common misconceptions and truths about millennials lawyers
  • Mentoring, evaluations, and feedback tips that emphasize professionalism and increase associate self-sufficiency
  • And more!

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Mitigating (& Embracing) Mistakes: A Law Firm’s Guide To Trial & Error

Scientists admit “we were wrong,” this summer about “inert” Pluto, which they now know to be a “very active” dwarf planet, reports The Independent.

Some might wonder why this even makes headlines. Scientists are wrong all the time. In the 19th century, Sir William Thomson, Lord Kelvin, was the first person to use physics to calculate the ages of the Earth and sun–and he was only off by about a multiple of 50.

Chemist Linus Pauling was confident that the structure of DNA was a triple heliz. Unfortunately for him, Francis Crick and James D. Watson discovered the double helix structure of DNA that same year in 1953.

And, among the many famous equations created by Einstein was one called the the cosmological constant, which he introduced because he thought the universe was static. We now know the universe is expanding and Einstein called the cosmological constant his “greatest blunder.

Nevertheless, some of science’s greatest blunders have actually resulted in even bigger breakthroughs. In the ase of Kelvin, the calculations themselves were ground-breaking.

For Einstein, the cosmological constant was eventually re-introduced by scientists once they realized the universe was expanding at an accelerated pace. Finally, for Pauling, his triple-helix structure may have been malconceived, but the two-time Nobel Prize winner contributed so much to science already, the incident reminds us that mistakes, well, they make us human.

Lawyers are only human, too. Sure, law firms are lush with Type A personalities, perfectionists, and over-achievers, but to achieve anything novel requires taking a long road paved with mistakes.

A law firm’s first-years are often afraid to speak up, act up, or go home for that matter; instead, they reread every brief, every motion until it’s flawless and they’re blameless. Nowadays, in the legal profession, associates get little experience in the courtroom where there’s a trial, but no room for error.

However, managers in every field agree, it’s vital for rising stars to gain first-hand experience. There will, of course, be mistakes. Attorneys are known for having tempers in these moments.

But Kathryn Schulz—expert on being wrong (no, seriously)—would have us believe that a series of cultural and learned behavior has led society to believe “rightness” equals “goodness” and that this is a huge social and practical problem.

Embracing being wrong is, in fact, a key to how our businesses and people thrive.

According to Schulz, here’s why.

“Do you remember that Loony Tunes cartoon where there’s this pathetic coyote who’s always chasing and never catching a roadrunner? In pretty much every episode of this cartoon there’s a moment where the coyote is chasing the roadrunner and the roadrunner runs off a cliff, which s fine, he’s a bird, he can fly. But the thing is that the coyote’s fine too. He just keeps running—right up until the moment that he looks down and realizes that he’s in mid-air. That’s when we’re wrong about something…we’re already wrong, we’re already in trouble, but we feel like we’re on solid ground… [the feeling of being wrong] feels like being right.”

We’ve all had instances when we are over confident about our rightness.

For example, we’ve discovered the best defense, the best argument for the case based on the facts. In these moments, generally, we assume anybody who disagrees with us is ignorant of the evidence or of the logic to which we ourselves are privy. As soon as we become aware that these same opponents—either our adversary on the opposite bench or sometimes our own second chair—do have access to the same information, we assume it’s still a deficiency on their part. Correct puzzle pieces, wrong combination. If, in the end, these people still disagree, our last assumption is that they’re enemies, distorting the truth “for their own malevolent purposes.”

It is this attachment to our rightness that leads to the mistreatment of colleagues and other unprofessional behavior in the office, but, just as important, it prevents us from making mistakes that can lead to breakthroughs.

Students attend law school because they are united in the same desires to problem solve. When presented with a case and facts in that case, attorneys must decide what is the best combination of arguments to convince a judge or jury to award a desirable verdict. Law students should be the first to admit cases are not always won by “rightness.” So why the obsession with being right?

While it’s no goal to be wrong, an incorrect answer by a risk-taking associate or naïve first-year should not be a punishable offense. Instead, turn it around. Some of the most interesting products and innovative concepts have emerged from trial and error (Also read, Duly Noted)–a process you should consider rewarding at your firm.

For Schulz’s entire presentation, watch the video here.

Just because your firm embraces trial and error, doesn’t mean its mistakes must be costly. The loss of trade secrets–ranging from proprietary formulas to confidential information to production methodologies–can have devastating impacts for a company. Whether a formula for a product, a unique method of conducting business, or another type of sensitive material, companies want to ensure that their investments in products, employees, and processes do not fall into a competitor’s hands and cause damage.

Take C4CM’s audio course “Counsel’s Guide to Trade Secret Protection: Preventing and Avoiding Costly Errors and Penalties,” on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:15 PM Eastern.

This information-packed CLE webinar explores best practices for preventing and avoiding costly errors and penalties when dealing with trade secrets, third parties and litigation. You will also gain legal insights on how to ensure compliance and keep trade secrets a secret.

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What Law Firms Can Learn From A Career In Software Development About Retaining Employees

According to one attorney-turned-developer’s calculations, after 43 year of employment, at age 65, the software developer will have saved $2,102,010 by investing in a fourth of his take home pay minus student loans.

What’s the figure for an attorney? Almost a million dollars less than the software developer ($1,268,404).

So how did William Ha, former civil litigator, come to this conclusion?

First, an attorney starts his career later and with higher student debt—a lot higher. As a result, the take-home pay that an attorney is able to invest over the next 40 years is both lower and delayed.

Of course, Ha acknowledges that each job has an “X Factor” that accounts for non-monetary yields. For example:

“The lawyer can make partner at a rather large, making a base pay of say $1,000,000 a year, and the software developer can take a company public as an earlier employee if not CEO, cashing in on his own millions,” writes Ha.

There are a variety of unknowns that affect this calculation, but Ha believes that the software engineer still wins out. A software engineer gets paid a pretty penny for any side work she completes (and a lawyer is not allowed to offer the same services).

In addition, law firms cannot go public based on ABA Professional Rules. Furthermore, to maintain the professional independence of a lawyer, no lawyer or law firm can share legal fees with a non-lawyer, explains Ha in “Economics of Software Development v. The Practice of Law – A Rough Look at the Professions”.

So, whereas law firm behemoth, Baker and McKenzie, brings in $2.54 billion in revenue in 2014, with over 11,500 employees (roughly $173,000 per employee—if they can shares these legal fees), Facebook for the same year, brings in 12.466 billion with 6,337 employees, creating $1,700,000 per employee.

In software development, it certainly pays to work for “the man.” For lawyers, it pays to be partner.

Ha moved to Los Angeles after leaving civil litigation and worked for an iOS app developer (via ATL).

“There, I saw young people my age and younger 1) making a good salary, 2) having fun at work, 3) leaving on the dot at 5pm, and 4) not having to deal with a brutal job market. This was the first exposure to software development (aside from my preconceived notions). Is this real life? I wanted to be part of this somehow…”

He converted.

As a law firm manager, does that mean you should quit (and encourage young associates to quit) to join the ranks of Facebook employees?

No, not necessarily. What Ha points out is that so much of what makes a career “worthwhile” is (1) passion and interest in the field; and (2) lifestyle.

To retain your law firm associates, it’s important to remind them why they decided to become lawyers in the first place. Perhaps it was passion for the law. If so, allow your young associates to take on pro-bono cases that they’re passionate about.

If your young associates are keen on making partner, enroll them in business development courses. Encourage them to network at professional events or join legal associations. Host dinners for your community businesses and mentor your young associates in the art of wining and dining potential new clients.

Finally, if your associates are starting to burn out—much like Ha—provide more flexible hours or a more comfortable workplace. There are a variety of innovative workplace practices that your firm can implement that don’t cost a dime, but improve the morale and the retention rates of employees (read about some suggestions here).

When interviewing potential new associates, hiring partners asks hard questions about why these law school grads what to join the firm. But, it’s equally valuable to investigate why young talent is leaving.

A growing number of firms have created non-partnership/career associate tracks to address client’ demands for value. These associates work fewer hours, and are paid lower salaries than partner-track lawyers. So how then does the firm incentivize these lawyers?

Balancing compensation in a firm that embraces multiple associate tracks is tricky. Keeping non-partner and partner tier associates happy and committed to the firm requires a compensation plan that fairly reflects the efforts, hours and status of each.

Learn more about attracting, retaining and compensating career associates with an eye towards loyalty, fairness, and firm profitability in C4CM’s webinar “Re-inventing Associate Compensation: Pay Structures that Incentivize, Reward & Retain Non-Partner Track Attorneys” on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 at 2:00 PM to 3:15 PM Eastern.

You will learn how to:

  • Use creativity, rather than conformity as a criteria for non-salary rewards
  • Utilize proven methods leading firms are using to create firm-building bonus structures for these associates
  • Build associate loyalty and reduce turnover
  • Increase associate awareness of firm business when they are not tasked as rainmakers
  • Evaluate career associate performance in addition to hours

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Gamers Rejoice! Computer Games Make People Smarter, Says Study

Evolution-of-Gamers-lRarely do you hear parents encouraging their children to play computer games. Yet, neuroscientists are prescribing just that to promote brain development and cognitive skills.

Two recent studies have shown that there are real life-size benefits to playing in virtual reality.

A study published in April 2014 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that less than six hours of brain games played over the course of ten weeks allowed frequently-absent first-graders—those who attend school irregularly due to family problems or income-related issues—to catch up with their regularly-attending peers in math and language grades, reports Dan Hurley in The Atlantic.

Another study, presented at the April 2014 Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting in Boston, aggregated data from 13 previous studies of computerized brain-training in young adults to ultimately conclude that training enhances what’s called “fluid intelligence,” or the fundamental human ability to detect patterns, reason, and learn.

Ergo, playing games makes people smarter.

Other scientists are calling for study replication and further experimentation. But, it’s not the first time that brainteasers and logic games have been linked to physical differences in the brain.

For example, a recent study from the University of California, Berkeley, published in the online journal Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, showed that applying to law school doesn’t just test your intelligence, it increases it.

How? Studying for the LSAT reinforces circuits in the brain and can bridge the gap between the right and left hemispheres, which, according to researchers, can improve an individual’s reasoning ability and possibly IQ score, reported Sam Favate for the Wall Street Journal.

Among those adults who studied, the brain scans showed an increase in connectivity between the frontal lobes of the brain, as well as between the frontal and parietal lobes, which are the areas of the brain associated with reasoning and thinking, summarizes Favate in the Wall Street Journal.

The LSAT is a unique exam made up of logic games. Essentially, the study is a continuation of the findings in children and young adults showing that analytical skills can be honed with repetition and practice.

The idea that critical thinking and eye for detail are actually skills to be cultivated, not born to an individual or certain personalities.

“What we were interested in is whether and how the brain changes as a result of LSAT preparation—which we think is, fundamentally, reasoning training,” said lead researcher Allyson Mackey, a graduate student in UC Berkeley’s Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute.

“We wanted to show that the ability to reason is malleable in adults.”

The application for these findings is vast. Instead of requiring CLEs, should the American Bar Association require lawyers to complete a certain number of logic games or problem sets over the course of their career?

Should attorneys take the new LSAT exam each year, just to keep up their cognitive skills?

At your law firm, think about implementing informal “game nights” with prizes and rankings to incentivize participation. Not only will your employees have the opportunity to bond with one another during these social events, they will also hone their cognitive skills and increase brain development.

Find out who at the firm is involved in computer games and encourage them to get more law firm employees involved.

Playing games at your firm will boost interoffice morale, create a positive-competitive corporate culture, and strengthen the most important skill set required of its legal team—analytical thinking.

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Stop Monkeying Around! Court Says Chimps Not Human (& Why Your Employees May Need A Vacation)

Feeling trapped at work? You’re not the only one. Just talk to Tommy, the chimpanzee living in a cage in upstate Fulton County, New York.

The former entertainment chimp has been going stir-crazy for upwards of a decade, about when he was given to his current owner, according to the BBC. Unfortunately for him, this Thursday, a New York court ruled that Tommy did not have the same legal protections as a human and must remain in captivity.

And you thought you had it bad.

The decision was handed down on Thursday, after the animal rights group Nonhuman Rights Project sued Tommy’s owner last year claiming that chimps had similar characteristics to the humans and thus deserved basic rights. One of those rights includes freedom.

Chimps “possess complex cognitive abilities that are so strictly protected when they’re found in human beings,” Nonhuman Rights Project president Steven Wise told Reuters last year, according to the International Business Times.

“There’s no reason why they should not be protected when they’re found in chimpanzees.”

Caged chimps around the nation (or, at least, the State of New York) are saddened today by Judge Karen Peters ruling:

“So far as legal theory is concerned, a person is any being whom the law regards as capable of rights and duties… Needless to say, unlike human beings, chimpanzees cannot bear any legal duties, submit to societal responsibilities or be held legally accountable for their actions.”

So, at roughly 40 years old, Tommy is trapped.

But you don’t have to be.

Law offices can feel sterile or stifling, which is why you need to get out once in awhile. Surveys find 40 percent of Americans leave three to seven days of vacation per year unused, according to the New York Times.

It’s time to break out of your cage. In fact, those Americans who do unchain themselves from their desks and decide to take regular vacations end up happier, say surveys.

A new Nielsen poll commissioned by Diamond Resorts International finds that 71 percent of American workers who regularly take vacations are satisfied with their jobs, according to the New York Times. Of those that do not take regular vacations, less than 50 percent report being satisfied with their jobs.

As a law firm manager, you should ensure that your employees and associates take their much-needed holiday hours. Rested, relaxed, and satisfied employees stay at firms longer and are more productive. Employees who take regular vacations have also have better overall job performance, writes OpenView (via Huffington Post).

Law firms are increasingly tightening their belts when it comes to salary and attorney partner-track promotion, so now is the time to provide compensation in other ways. If your firm can’t afford bonuses this year, try giving extra vacation days.

You’ll find that employees will return to work with better attitudes and even work longer hours as a result. Plus, a boost in office morale has no price tag.

However, every monkey needs a banana. You may find employees are reluctant to take time off. Employees sometimes feel that their employer does not really want them to leave the office, or that—in their absence—they will be replaced or made redundant.

This is why some companies have created oddly innovative incentives to push employees to take vacation, according to OpenView (via Huffington Post):

  • FullContact, a Denver Software company, pays employees $7,500 to go on vacation, disconnect entirely and not work at all.
  • Evernote gives employees a $1,000 to take off days in at least 1 week increments.
  • Netflix offers an unlimited vacation policy as long as employees get their work done.

If your firm can’t offer more days off, then consider implementing a telecommute policy. Sometimes just working from home can feel like a stay-cation.

In the end, companies need to find a policy that fits its unique corporate culture. Poll your associates to find out why, exactly, they’re not taking all of their vacation days off.

Sometimes the only bars that imprison us are the ones we put up ourselves.

Check out more creative ideas for employee compensation with C4CM’s audio course, “Associate Compensation: Leveraging Hybrid Methods that Combine Lockstep with Merit-Based Tiers.”

In just 75 minutes, our expert faculty will examine the key factors in associate compensation that contribute to firms staying competitive and profitable in this rapidly shifting environment, including:

  • Why change? How client demands are fueling the rapid fire changes to associate tracks
  • Details on the types of alternatives to pure lock-step compensation models and how these alternatives compensate associates
  • Ways to develop and manage meaningful criteria for promotions outside of lock-step
  • Crucial performance review criteria to include in your merit-based compensation system
  • Beyond compensation increases, what matters most to associates, mid-levels and partners
  • Where firms have failed when it comes to associate compensation overhauls and how to avoid their compensation mistakes

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Nobel Prize For Law? Not Yet, But Maybe One Day…

It’s unofficial “thank your neighborhood scientist” day.

Today, three researchers got the call that their discovery merited the most coveted award in science, the Nobel Prize.

Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura were honored for inventing the blue light emitting diode and will split the $1.2 million prize.

These scientists created what others had failed to do for 30 years: create the blue diode for LED lights. Not only do LED lights save on energy, they don’t contain mercury.

The Nobel committee said of this discovery, it “hold[s] great promise for increasing the quality of life for over 1.5 billion people around the world who lack access to electricity grids,” reports CNN.

“They triggered a fundamental transformation of lighting technology,” the committee commented.

“They succeeded where everyone else failed.”

Lawyers are not generally considered scientists, although they do produce—on occasion—scientific work published in academic journals.

But, winners of the Nobel Prize in Economics are not scientists either, in the strict sense of the word. They are recognized for their academic achieves, and the winner is not even selected from the same committee as the Peace Prize.

Furthermore, the major contribution of prize-winning economists is frequently in the field of public policy—not far from the domain of lawyers.

As such, many feel there should be a Nobel Prize for Law, one to recognize the field’s commitment to social transformation or humanistic scholarship.

“A Nobel Prize in Law might be given each year to that individual or group of individuals who have contributed most powerfully to the development of the rule of law,” writes Garrett Epps for The Nation.

“Some remarkable men and women might be candidates: lawyers like Li Heping; judges like Baltasar Garzón of Spain, who began the human rights prosecution of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet; Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry, the chief justice of Pakistan, who has resisted President Pervez Musharraf’s attempts to subvert the legal system; legal scholars like Cherif Bassiouni, the Egyptian-born father of the International Criminal Court, a former Peace Prize nominee; and American feminist Catherine MacKinnon.”

For now, the most lawyers can hope for is local recognition for their efforts. Law firms should consider establishing their own rewards for associates who have succeeded in publishing in law journals or peer-reviewed publications.

Not only will your firm be pushing the current boundaries of the field of law, but it will also incentivize your lawyers to research hot-button topics and the most recent court opinions that might end up providing unique insights into your clients’ cases.

In addition, encouraging publishing among your law firm professionals will encourage cross-firm collaboration. This is especially important for large firms with many specialties who would benefit from cross-departmental communication.

Finally, receiving recognition—no matter the scale, global or local—reminds your attorneys of the greater good and why they joined law in the first place. When it comes to choosing a firm, younger associates are looking for a place “to belong” and for a community with purpose.

You’ll retain more lawyers when you foster a workplace committed not just to clients, but also to scholarship and intellectual life.

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What’s Your Firm’s Associate Compensation Model & Should You Change It?

Working as a first-year associate in a law firm used to be simple–painful, but simple. There was lengthy, tedious document review and paying your dues (literally and figuratively).

But today, the job has become much more complicated. Firms are dissatisfied with the traditional compensation model for younger associates and are looking to leverage more out of each one. Numerous law firms have completely thrown out the old hierarchical, lockstep model of associates and replaced it instead with a merit-based one.

Keeping your head down and listening to what the name partners tell you is no longer enough. Associates are now evaluated on going above and beyond, on “delivering legal excellence,” “driving client value” and “building a practice,” in the words of Seyfarth’s merit-based pay system.

“It takes the process off of autopilot, so we’re really dependent upon getting feedback from partners,” Laura Saklad, the chief lawyer development officer for Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP, one of the first firms to ditch former lockstep models for associate pay, said to Law360.

“We have found that moving away from an automatic advancement system has actually created a greater buy-in among the partners for the need to give really substantive answers.”

Although this system of constant evaluation may seem stressful to associates, law firm managers believe merit-based pay not only improves performance and productivity, it also helps increase communication between associate levels.

“We’re putting a lot of energy into ensuring that we have a strong mentoring program in place and that mentoring conversations are happening in between reviews so associates are getting clear messages about where there are skill gaps and how to fill them,” Saklad said to Law360.

With these types of compensation systems, it’s impossible to simply dismiss a performance review or to forget to follow-up in a matter. Associates must make the grade in order to make the pay. This requires diligently listening to areas where your performance is weak and then making concerted efforts to improve those skills.

Although there appear to be many benefits to such a system, what are its downsides?

First, it certainly encourages competition, not comraderie among same-level associates. Second, it’s a more difficult system for larger firms. Finally, it may reward favoritism. Should an associate receive a lackluster review beause he or she has a less dynamic personality? Is there such a thing as a completely objective evaluator, and if not, should pay really be tied to such a subjective measure?

Reed Smith, the large Pittsburgh-based law firm, announced a similar restructuring of its policies with regard to associate performance and promotion, stating:

“The firm has revamped its associate model, doing away with associate classes based strictly on entry date in favor of three associate groups that will have formal training from the time they enter the firm until they are ready to be considered for partnership. . . . The goal of the program is to provide a road map for associates detailing the specific skills required at each of the newly created levels–junior, midlevel, and senior associates. Associates won’t be able to move to the next tier until they have met those requirements. Compensation will be tied to those competencies by 2011 as well.”

Changes in traditional associate compensation models are here to stay. The question is, in the land of billable hours and time constraints, do these law firms have the capabilities to successfully implement such large-scale, high-stakes training programs?

A lot is being blamed on the economic crisis. Will new associates ever be as profitable for the firm as they were before the economic downturn? The answer is yes. But, to return to pre-crisis levels of profitability, law firms need to adapt to the current situation. It involves new technology, new tools, new management, and new ways of motivating your employees.

Revamping the Associate Model for Max Profitability: Leveraging New Lawyers for Higher Per Partner Profits is an information-packed webinar that examines the strategic and financial implications of the changing associate model, and what law firms should do to stay competitive and profitable in this rapidly shifting environment.

Attend Wedesday, September 3, 2014, from 2pm to 3:15pm EST and explore current associate management trends, new compensation systems, and other key aspects of associate management that impact your firm’s bottom line:

  • Where we are today and what has changed
  • Emerging economic models and how they affect associate profitability
  • New profitability drivers for 2014 and beyond
  • Trends and changes to the associate management process
  • Real-life firm examples of how to monitor associate’s progress and performance
  • Best practices for handling the first two years
  • Methods to make the associate evaluation process matter more
  • Why versatility matters when it comes to associate advancement and how to build it in to your programs
  • Common associate communication snafus and how to fix them

Trust experts like The Center for Competitive Management when you’re looking to upgrade your law firm management style. 

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