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More Than The Holiday Blues: How Your Firm Can Combat Employee Anxiety & Depression

Thanksgiving sparks the beginning of family get-togethers, year-end deadlines, and, as a result, mental health concerns.

Considering this contentious, recent election coincides with the arrival of holidays already associated with anxiety, stress, and drinking way too much, it’s important to discuss how your law firm or business will handle behavioral health problems of its employees this season.

The American Bar Association (ABA) recently partnered with Hazelden and reported findings from its study on the rates of substance use and other mental health concerns among lawyers in the Journal of Addiction Medicine. While they may not surprise you, the results can help law firm managers better prepare for a potentially dicey December.

One of the more interesting takeaways was that younger lawyers are at higher risk for abusing alcohol. Apparently attorneys in the first 10 years of their practice experience the highest rates of problematic use (28.9%), followed by attorneys practicing for 11 to 20 years (20.6), reports Above The Law blog.

It goes without saying that anxiety and stress are highly correlated with alcohol abuse. And, the study somberly states, “ubiquity of alcohol in the legal professional culture certainly demonstrates both its ready availability and social acceptability, should one choose to cope with their mental health problems in that manner,” (via ATL).

It’s easy to think that symptoms of these behavioral problems would be evident. If younger associates are starting to smell of alcohol or miss deadlines, certainly that’s cause for concern.

However, extreme reactions to stress and anxiety can happen under the radar. Take, for instance, a sad story about a law graduate who recently committed suicide after failing the California Bar Exam.

The graduate’s parents issued a statement. In addition to expression surprise, they implored other students to reach out for support.

“Our son Brian Christopher Grauman unexpectedly took his own life on Friday evening 18 Nov 2016, after learning he did not pass the California Bar Exam. We are still trying to understand such an extreme reaction by Brian. We know he loved studying and debating law, and he was intently focused on fulfilling his dream of practicing law in the courtroom….”

“It appears the idea of repeating the last 7 months of his life to again prepare for the Bar Exam and then once more nervously await months for the results was too much for him. We deeply regret that he did not take the time to talk to anyone after learning his exam results.”

In the ideal world, a law firm manager can sense his or her associate’s breaking point. But, in reality, the human emotional state can be fragile and unpredictable.

That’s why it’s really important to bring these issues out into the open and provide a forum for your employees to express their anxieties, desires, and concerns.

Here’s how you can do it.

First, survey your associates to find out how prevalent these issues are within your firm. Ensure its anonymity. Second, confirm with your healthcare provider that your firm’s employees have affordable access to counseling and other mental health services. Circulate these options in a firm-wide memo.

Finally, make it clear to your office that you take mental health seriously by offering preventative activities, such as gym memberships, gift certificates to local spas, bring in a masseur this month for 15-minutes massages, or invite a yoga teacher to offer classes before work for a week to introduce associates to the sport.

Consider making wellness a priority and outlet your employees’ happiness, not happy hour. You won’t just survive this holiday season—you’ll thrive.

 

-WB

For more ideas about how to generate a productive, thriving law firm, learn more from The Center for Competitive Management’s webinars here.

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Divorce, Democrats & Distraction: Strategies For Regaining Concentration In The Workplace

Angelina Jolie files for divorce from Brad Pitt. Hints emerge that George H.W. Bush will vote for Clinton. NFL versus the national anthem.

The news today is enough to make your head spin. With so much going on in the world—serious or not so much—it can be hard to pay attention to work.

Luckily, according to a recent study, your brain is smart enough to compensate for concentration-breaking events. It turns out, when you are busy with a task that requires sight (say, lengthy doc review on a computer screen?) your brain reduces hearing so that you can focus.

“The brain is really clever, and helps us to concentrate on what we need to do. At the same time, it screens out distractions that are extraneous to the task. But the brain can’t cope with too many tasks: only one sense at a time can perform at its peak,” Jerker Rönnberg of Linköping University, professor of psychology with a focus on disability research, said to Science Daily.

Rönnberg and colleagues have investigated what happens in the brain when people are given a visual task, such as a student taking an exam or a person driving a car. The researchers were also studying how a person’s concentration changes when background noise increases.

Although findings show a high cognitive load in the form of a visual task impairs the brain’s response to sound in both the cortex and also in the parts of the brain that deal with emotion, there are other ways you can hone your concentration skills. One that don’t need scientific confirmation via a catscan.

First, ignore your e-mail. E-mail is the quickest way to lose your momentum on a task.

Instead, create a schedule for checking e-mail, like once every hour. This will give you an occasional, much-needed break from completing your more important projects.

Second, craft a To-Do list.

When you’re feeling overwhelmed by the sheer number of tasks at hand, your concentration starts to decline. It feels like too much to do in too little time.

Creating a to-do list is one of those basic, but still valuable tools for any professional. Create a to-do list for the day and for the week. If you can, assign dates to each task (you can modify them later).

Creating a to-do list will get you in the habit of writing things down, and it will also make it easier to focus on tackling one task at a time. Your reward? Crossing it off your list.

To-Do lists are also one of the many ways a lawyer can use Excel.

Finally, take a break—a physical break—when you feel your concentration waning.

According to an old Japanese study, a 15-minute nature-walk can drop stress hormones by 16 percent, blood pressure by 2 percent, and heart rate by 4 percent, reports Montana Public Radio. And, a recent study from 2015 suggests that the same health benefits you receive from a $20,000 raise can be experienced simply by living in a neighborhood surrounded by trees.

So, get up from your desk and get a small amount of physical activity. Although your workplace may be surrounded by aluminum trees, i.e., skyrise buildings, you can still take a walk about town for your health.

Plus, a 15-minute break outside the office will do a world of good by letting you forget today’s insane worldwide news.

-WB

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When Is Discipline For Political-Related Behavior Appropriate & Legal? How To Have Controversial Conversations In The Workplace

Should We Respect A Law No One Follows?” is the deliberately inflammatory question titling a blog post by Matt Kaiser on Above The Law blog today.

He introduces the topic of respecting laws that are meant to be broken with a few personal stories, among them:

“At some point, I started running an experiment to see how long it would take for a middle-aged white guy in a Prius with a suspended license to get pulled over.

It took about 20 months.

I was given a warning. Which I am grateful for.

Speeding is an odd offense. Under a certain point, no one thinks that speeding is morally problematic. And no one thinks that you should actually drive exactly the speed limit—going 56 in a 55 is illegal, sure, but it isn’t really illegal.”

After other anecdotal evidence, from bogus traffic tickets, speed cameras, or guys being prosecuted for killing fish facing 20-year sentences, the post concludes, “Virtually no one follows the law to its letter. No one respects the law. Do we promote it by slamming the unlucky few?”

“Or, rather, would it be better—if we worry about respect for the law—to write laws that are actually enforced as written?”

It’s easy to sucked into Kaiser’s argument. Anybody who has ever been ticketed for jaywalking, or actually given a $50 fine for throwing out “household trash” in a public street garbage bin, understands the predicament of enforcing laws that don’t really describe illicit behavior.

There are some stranger laws, too, that will rarely be enforced but remain on the books. For example, in Woburn, Massachusetts, it’s illegal to drink alcohol while standing up. Or, in West Lafayette, Ohio, it’s illegal to keep ducks as pets (an Iraq War vet was actually fined for it once).

If you care to look, there are likely dozens of laws that are outdated in your local precinct.

Nevertheless, respect for the law should not be a personal decision, it’s a criminal one—obey the rules or submit to the consequences. What exactly is Matt Kaiser arguing here? (Actually, Kaiser is most peeved about speed cameras, which he calls “a moral abomination that is offensive to the idea of a free society,” but we digress.)

Matt Kaiser, ATL author, writes about white-collar crime from a defense-attorney point-of-view. He has represented stockbrokers, tax preparers, doctors, drug dealers, and political appointees in federal investigations and indicted cases, according to his ATL bio.

Although you may or may not agree with Kaiser’s take on the law, he probably sounds like a few—if not many—of your peers.

Law firm associates love to talk about controversial cases and news items. The more inflammatory the debate, the better.

Whether it’s the current U.S. Presidential candidates, the newest judge appointments, or discussions about whether or not that Trump supporter who suction-cupped his way up Trump tower yesterday should be prosecuted, these topics are provocative and also occupying. Everybody has an opinion.

So what happens when political talk interrupts workflow or escalates to bad behavior? It may surprise you to know that there’s a host of legal concerns surrounding barring political talk or disciplining employees for engaging in political behavior in the office.

To avoid these legal landmines, take C4CM’s webinar, “Politics in the Workplace: How to Legally Manage Politically Charged Activity at Work,” on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 from 2:00 PM To 3:15 PM Eastern. In it you will learn what employers can do to manage political activity in the workplace, including: 

  • What employers can do to manage political discussions and fundraising
  • How to address political discussions in the workplace under federal and state laws
  • What employers should never do when it comes to political activities or chatter
  • How the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) applies
  • How the new SCOTUS ruling Heffernan vs. City of Paterson impacts employers
  • When an employee’s political discussion is protected by the First Amendment

By the end of the information-packed session, you will know more about:

  • When discipline for political-related behavior is appropriate and legal
  • What defines political harassment in the workplace
  • What constitutes business harm from employee’s political speech
  • How to handle controversial or political social media posts by an employee
  • How to handle office sponsored political functions supported by management
  • Dress code do’s and don’ts as they apply to political speech 

It’s ok to ask the question. But, as a law firm manager, you should know the liability issues that come along with answering.

 

-WB

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New Study: Exercise Lowers Cancer Risk & How Your Law Firm Can Encourage Fitness!

According to a new study—which confirms pretty much every other study—exercise is the best thing for your body, even reducing your chance of developing cancer. In fact, you may reduce your chances of developing cancer by seven percent overall, and much more when taking into account specific types of cancer.

The study, which involved over 1.4 million people, conducted by the National Cancer Institute, was recently published in the JAMA Internal Medicine (via Voice of America).

In it, researchers found that the risk of developing specific types of cancers plummeted: esophageal cancer by 42 percent, liver cancer by 27 percent, lung cancer by 26 percent, specific type of leukemia by 20 percent, and breast cancer by 10 percent.

Exercise “can help people reduce their risk of heart disease. It can reduce the risk of diabetes. It extends life expectancy,” added Steven Moore of the National Cancer Institute, who led the aforementioned study, in an interview with NBC News.

Among the possible workout routines were walking, running, and swimming. Researchers also took into account the amount of each exercise in minutes per week and controlled for other risks of cancer like smoking and obesity.

Moore explained that potential mechanisms resulting in these outcomes were potentially lower hormone levels, like estrogen, which has been known to lower the risk of breast and endometrial cancers. Also, exercise helps maintain insulin, explained Moore, which may lower overall inflammation in the body.

Of course, diet helps drive these results, but researchers are overwhelmingly convinced that exercise is the key to low stress and higher levels of health.

Most people are aware of the importance of exercise, but lack the motivation to begin working out.

Any workplace (especially in stressful ones like at a law firm) should take two steps toward improving employee productivity and job satisfaction.

The first step is preventative. Encourage your employees to exercise by incentivizing them with interoffice “most steps” competitions. Give out Fitbit devices for your year-end or other milestone bonuses and conduct a contest. The most steps in the week or month, for example, wins something—like being taken out to lunch, Starbucks gift card, or a small prize. The idea is simple, yet the results can be life-changing for an individual.

For the firm, exercise leads to lower stress and lower illness, which will lead an employee to work in an efficient and timely manner.

If a contest won’t work for your firm, strike up a deal with a neighboring gym to provide employees with free or heavily discounted memberships.

This will help a firm prevent the next step: post-illness planning and policies.

What happens when an employee is diagnosed with cancer?

With 1.7 million new cancer cases expected in 2016, your firm will most definitely be impacted by this disease.

Thankfully, with advances in the treatment in cancer, a diagnosis does not have to be as grim a prognosis as it once was.

In fact, many employees with cancer are willing and able to work during the treatment and recovery process—but cancer in the workplace raises a myriad of complexities for employers, including:

  • ADA and reasonable accommodation issues
  • FMLA leave—particularly intermittent leave
  • GINA compliance, particularly with family medical history concerning cancer
  • Managing questions, rumors, and gossip in an effective yet legally compliant way
  • Confidentiality concerning the employee’s diagnosis—and prognosis
  • Medical certifications
  • EAP referrals
  • Allegations of bias on the basis of actual or perceived disability
  • Balancing compassion with productivity concerns

So, it’s important for your firm to learn more about best policies and practices when faced with this challenge, including:

  • The employer’s role in providing accurate information about employees’ rights and obligations to take advantage of the benefits your organization may offer, such as short- and long-term disability
  • What the employee expects, and your legal obligations to meet their requests
  • Tips on how to handle employees’ emotional reactions and attitudes in dealing with cancer diagnoses, from both a human compassion level and the impact on performance
  • Practical ways in which the ADA and the FMLA may intersect concerning cancer diagnoses
  • Types of ADA accommodations that may be required for employees dealing with the impact of cancer or the side-effects of treatment that may take many months 

Take C4CM’s webinar today, “Managing Cancer in the Workplace: Legal and Practical Solutions for Accommodating Employees with Cancer,” on Thursday, June 2, 2016, from 2:00 PM To 3:15 PM Eastern time.

After the webinar you will have the proper training, but with proper encouragement and dose of daily exercise, hopefully you and your firm won’t have to use it.

-WB

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Law Firms, Watch Collectors & How To Know When ‘Time Is Money’

In the case of high-end watch collectors, time is literally money.

At a recent Christie’s auction, a Patek Philippe watch sold for more $50,000—quite an improvement over its 1950s retail price of $275, reports CBS News.

“I’ve seen artwork being traded for watches. I have seen somebody trade a very rare Patek Philippe for a down payment on an apartment,” said Benjamin Clymer, Founder and Editorial Director, Hodinkee.com.

In today’s digital age, you still can’t stop the clock. Apple shelled out $21 million in a “lump sum” to license a clock-face design from the Swiss Federal Railway service, reported French news agency AFP, citing a Swiss paper.

Swiss Federal Railway service (SBB) objected to the clock-face design in iOS 6 because it too closely resembled a trademarked design created in 1944 by SBB employee Hans Hilfiker. Today the design is used in train stations throughout Switzerland and licensed the pricey Swiss watch manufacturer, Mondaine.

Hilfiker’s design is timeless, and thus has been honored by both the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the London Design Museum. The Swiss consider it a national symbol of punctuality, but it’s also an example to lawyers of the power technology holds when protected by intellectual property.

It’s not just watches; there are myriad other reasons why technology converts time into money for your firm. Here are some lessonds, according to an Accellis Technology article, for law firms:

“When you’re efficient, you take on less risk – Simply put, the less time you spend on a contingency case, the less risk associated with taking it on. If you lose, you’re not sacrificing as much time or revenue. If you win, you’ll make the same amount of money, but since you spent less time on the case, your margins are higher. And, if you win or lose but don’t get paid, you’re out less money.

When you’re efficient, you can take on more cases – If you can generate a Will twice as fast as your competitor, you can do twice the amount of work, right? When your process for settling civil disputes speeds up, you can twice as many disputes.

When you’re efficient, you can spend more time on client-facing activities – Spend your new-found time meeting people, creating stronger relationships with your clients, and building value in your firm. Try to drive in new opportunities from your current client base (maybe they didn’t know you take on divorces). Did you know that once you have a client, each subsequent sale has a close ratio of over 70%? It’s easy money!”

To read the entire article, go here.

Sold on technology, but need to know where to start? Think about integrating the following products into your business systems:

The iPad.

Apps for the mobile phone and iPad have contributed some of the most significant improvements in efficiency and productivity within law firms in some time. Get with your IT Department to brainstorm how best to implement these gadgets into everyday legal activity.

For some of the best legal iPad apps, go here.

Near-field Communications (NFC) Technology.

From Google Wallet to Starbucks Mobile Payment App, NFC technology has myriad uses in law.

Read more about their applications here.

Social Media and Blogging.

Social media sites like LinkedIn or legal recruitment web-agencies, including lawcrossing.com, are cheap and easy ways to locate qualified candidates. It saves recruiters time and money by already compiling information about prospective employees.

Even if your firm is not looking to hire, it’s certainly still looking to recruit clients. At which point, social media—blog posts, tweets, or Facebook feeds—become crucial in advertising what services your firm offers, who its lawyers are, and why a client should hire you, as opposed to another firm.

In the time it took you to read this line, I sent a tweet and 500 people read it. Talk about a new value for time in money.

E-discovery software

By this time, most law firms already (from necessity) have some sort of electronic discovery software. However, when was it last updated?

The capabilities of software and technology changes rapidly everyday. If you haven’t updated your online systems for some time, it’s likely that there’s a more efficient way to organize and file e-discovery.

In sum, what have you learned about time, money, and technology? They’re inextricably linked.

So, consider putting together a “technology team” at your law firm—to keep apprised of developments in the field of legal gadgetry—one that will ensure your associates are not falling behind or sinking your bottom line. And if you’re feeling generous, make timeless timepieces part of your end-of-year bonuses: They appreciate (and your associates will appreciate them).

Regain control of your time and technology.

Take C4CM’s audio course, “Microsoft Outlook: Unlock E-Mail, Calendar and Time-Saving Secrets” on Tuesday, December 1, 2015, from 2:00 PM To 3:15 PM Eastern.

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Why Your Firm Should Fear Legal StartUps & How To Compete

Millennials, the group of tech-toting, flip-flop wearing adults born after 1980, have been the subject of eye-rolling. They’ve been stereotyped as expecting rewards just for participating and believing that spending long hours at the office is overrated.

Yet, legal professionals say that depiction as applied to their younger colleagues is wrong. In fact, they may work differently, taking full advantage of technology, but they’re smart and productive.

In fact, that may be why many of these young graduates interested in law are not going into law firms, at all. Millennials are forming legal start-ups that compete with both small and large, established firms in different ways.

In terms of small-firm competition, small start-up legal services companies can’t rely on a longstanding, loyal client base. Usually they must drive business, and small firms and start-ups will thus be competing among the same pool of potential customers.

Solo practitioners be wary, as well. New ideas, better comprehension of modern technology and a young mindset are assets to these start-up firms looking to represent similar start-ups in the business environment.

Take a look at your millennial competition:

1. Willing

“Founded by Eliam Medina and Rob Dyson, and backed by some of the biggest names in Silicon Valley like Y Combinator, 500 Startups and Ashton Kutcher, Willing is looking not only to change trust and estates, but the entire death care industry. Willing lets your write a will for free in five minutes, plan your funeral and after life and then connects you with the right vendors,” reports Above The Law.

“Is Willing even a legal tech company, or are they simply using a free, automated legal service — will writing — as a way to get customers?”

Well, it’s not the first time that free services have been used to bait and hook customers on related paid services. It’s a tried and true business model, so firms beware.

2. UpCounsel

How does it work? Clients answer a few questions about their legal needs, get connected to relevant attorneys who make a proposal and budget, and then interact online to complete your case.

“Matt Faustman at UpCounsel is convinced that the law firm model is going to change and he just raised a cool $10M from Menlo Ventures to prove it,” wrote Above The Law.

There’s a lot to be said for a system that makes it easier and—ah hem—pleasant to work with a lawyer.

The two examples above (get more here) explain why small or solo-practice law firms might fear the new legal kids on the block, but what do large law firms have to lose?

Properly incentivizing and compensating this new generation of lawyers is essential for your firm’s profitability, retention and key to attracting like-minded clients. When you’re losing key talent to start-ups due to hourly flexibility, superior work-life balance, or other compensation, it’s time to pay attention.

With all this venture capital and private equity money being thrown around to legal services start-ups, don’t be surprised if millennials follow the (dollar) bill.

What can you do? Consider:

  • Specific non-monetary rewards that are certain to improve job satisfaction (flexible leave or work-at-home policies, for example)
  • Tiered compensation for new associates
  • Alternative compensation models (i.e., anything except the traditional partnership model, such as including first-year associates in the profit-sharing)
  • Reward achievements, not simply hours for attorneys at every level

Need more specific ideas? Take the Center for Competitive Management’s webinar “Compensating Millennial Associates: Customizing Compensation and Rewards for Increased Productivity and Firm Profitability,” on Thursday, October 8, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:15 PM Eastern.

This information-packed webinar explores real-life methods for embracing the goals, expectations and ambitions of today’s millennial associates, and how to ‘meet in the middle’ when it comes to compensating this new generation.

Plus, in just 75 minutes, you will learn:

  • Surprising attitudes millennial lawyers have about total compensation
  • Who millennial lawyers are, and how they differ from other generations in terms of pay
  • Common misconceptions and truths about millennials lawyers
  • Mentoring, evaluations, and feedback tips that emphasize professionalism and increase associate self-sufficiency
  • And more!

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Mitigating (& Embracing) Mistakes: A Law Firm’s Guide To Trial & Error

Scientists admit “we were wrong,” this summer about “inert” Pluto, which they now know to be a “very active” dwarf planet, reports The Independent.

Some might wonder why this even makes headlines. Scientists are wrong all the time. In the 19th century, Sir William Thomson, Lord Kelvin, was the first person to use physics to calculate the ages of the Earth and sun–and he was only off by about a multiple of 50.

Chemist Linus Pauling was confident that the structure of DNA was a triple heliz. Unfortunately for him, Francis Crick and James D. Watson discovered the double helix structure of DNA that same year in 1953.

And, among the many famous equations created by Einstein was one called the the cosmological constant, which he introduced because he thought the universe was static. We now know the universe is expanding and Einstein called the cosmological constant his “greatest blunder.

Nevertheless, some of science’s greatest blunders have actually resulted in even bigger breakthroughs. In the ase of Kelvin, the calculations themselves were ground-breaking.

For Einstein, the cosmological constant was eventually re-introduced by scientists once they realized the universe was expanding at an accelerated pace. Finally, for Pauling, his triple-helix structure may have been malconceived, but the two-time Nobel Prize winner contributed so much to science already, the incident reminds us that mistakes, well, they make us human.

Lawyers are only human, too. Sure, law firms are lush with Type A personalities, perfectionists, and over-achievers, but to achieve anything novel requires taking a long road paved with mistakes.

A law firm’s first-years are often afraid to speak up, act up, or go home for that matter; instead, they reread every brief, every motion until it’s flawless and they’re blameless. Nowadays, in the legal profession, associates get little experience in the courtroom where there’s a trial, but no room for error.

However, managers in every field agree, it’s vital for rising stars to gain first-hand experience. There will, of course, be mistakes. Attorneys are known for having tempers in these moments.

But Kathryn Schulz—expert on being wrong (no, seriously)—would have us believe that a series of cultural and learned behavior has led society to believe “rightness” equals “goodness” and that this is a huge social and practical problem.

Embracing being wrong is, in fact, a key to how our businesses and people thrive.

According to Schulz, here’s why.

“Do you remember that Loony Tunes cartoon where there’s this pathetic coyote who’s always chasing and never catching a roadrunner? In pretty much every episode of this cartoon there’s a moment where the coyote is chasing the roadrunner and the roadrunner runs off a cliff, which s fine, he’s a bird, he can fly. But the thing is that the coyote’s fine too. He just keeps running—right up until the moment that he looks down and realizes that he’s in mid-air. That’s when we’re wrong about something…we’re already wrong, we’re already in trouble, but we feel like we’re on solid ground… [the feeling of being wrong] feels like being right.”

We’ve all had instances when we are over confident about our rightness.

For example, we’ve discovered the best defense, the best argument for the case based on the facts. In these moments, generally, we assume anybody who disagrees with us is ignorant of the evidence or of the logic to which we ourselves are privy. As soon as we become aware that these same opponents—either our adversary on the opposite bench or sometimes our own second chair—do have access to the same information, we assume it’s still a deficiency on their part. Correct puzzle pieces, wrong combination. If, in the end, these people still disagree, our last assumption is that they’re enemies, distorting the truth “for their own malevolent purposes.”

It is this attachment to our rightness that leads to the mistreatment of colleagues and other unprofessional behavior in the office, but, just as important, it prevents us from making mistakes that can lead to breakthroughs.

Students attend law school because they are united in the same desires to problem solve. When presented with a case and facts in that case, attorneys must decide what is the best combination of arguments to convince a judge or jury to award a desirable verdict. Law students should be the first to admit cases are not always won by “rightness.” So why the obsession with being right?

While it’s no goal to be wrong, an incorrect answer by a risk-taking associate or naïve first-year should not be a punishable offense. Instead, turn it around. Some of the most interesting products and innovative concepts have emerged from trial and error (Also read, Duly Noted)–a process you should consider rewarding at your firm.

For Schulz’s entire presentation, watch the video here.

Just because your firm embraces trial and error, doesn’t mean its mistakes must be costly. The loss of trade secrets–ranging from proprietary formulas to confidential information to production methodologies–can have devastating impacts for a company. Whether a formula for a product, a unique method of conducting business, or another type of sensitive material, companies want to ensure that their investments in products, employees, and processes do not fall into a competitor’s hands and cause damage.

Take C4CM’s audio course “Counsel’s Guide to Trade Secret Protection: Preventing and Avoiding Costly Errors and Penalties,” on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:15 PM Eastern.

This information-packed CLE webinar explores best practices for preventing and avoiding costly errors and penalties when dealing with trade secrets, third parties and litigation. You will also gain legal insights on how to ensure compliance and keep trade secrets a secret.

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