Why Tech Gurus Will Be Your Law Firm’s Next Hire

Founder of Dropbox Drew Houston, Founder of Paypal Peter Thiel, and former Apple CEO John Sculley, have a lot in common. They’re not just tech geeks, entrepreneurs, and billionaires; they’re also equally exhausted after speaking at this year’s Web Summit in Dublin.

They’re not alone. This year, the Web Summit gathered together 20,000 entrepreneurs, each with different objectives—to exhibit, to speak, to buy, or to sell—for four straining days straight.

Do you develop software? Then you were in Ireland last week.

Why? For the networking, for increasing your know-how, and for generally keeping up-to-date with technology news and invention.

One of the key issues being debated was Internet and online privacy. How should data be encrypted? What are the ethical ramifications of firms collecting and distributing user information? How can you stop security breaches on the cloud?

There were companies exhibiting mobile apps that store and protect your passwords so that you don’t have to remember them.

There were thousands of alternatives to Dropbox allowing users to store information in the cloud securely (or so they touted).

There were machines that coordinated your smartphone with smart accessories (Ringly—a company that sells rings that vibrate and glow depending on your mobile app notification, with semi-precious stones to boot—is sold out for a year). Ok, that has nothing to do with privacy or security, except that you can more discretely look at your phone during an important client meeting or even Friday date night.

One thing that was clear, among the thousands of exhibitors, there was no single solution to data security, there were many. And, everybody involved in web software and programming were prioritizing data security and privacy.

As should your law firm.

It should come as no surprise to know that there were legal services software representatives in attendance at the Summit, as well. They were also keeping up-to-date with what’s new in tech.

Legal services have permanently crossed over into the world of tech, even if key distributors—the lawyers, themselves—are a bit slower to the punch. This is why it is so important to train your lawyers in how to use legal tools and software, and why you should fully vet the software provider you end up choosing.

When was the last time your legal services software distributed a software update? What is their encryption strategy? Do they have a mobile app and how do they keep it secure?

As a law firm manager, if you don’t know how to ask hard (and hardware) questions, it’s time you hired an IT Department that does.

The Web Summit attracted software developers and engineers. The topic of tech has transformed select entrepreneurs into billionaires. But very soon it will also attract legal professionals (and it has already, just check out Clio, who attended).

In a bring-your-own-device, digital world, it’s time your firm understood exactly what these devices—mobile phones, tablets, and laptop computers—are capable of.

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