Bird? Plane? No, It’s Your Employer & Its Drone.

What would you do with a personal drone?

Would you have your neighborhood Chinese restaurant send food by drone? Would you attach a camera and see if your kids are really doing their homework upstairs?

As an employer, maybe you’d monitor exactly how productive your employees are during the day—find out if it’s true that mice play while the cat’s away.

Sounds far-fetched, but the future of drones in our workplace and everyday life is imminent. Prices are coming down, leaving drones at increasingly accessible rates of $500 on Amazon.

If you’re a truck driver, beware. Drones may be taking your job.

“Drones will augment the delivery world,” Mary Cummings, a drone expert who teaches at MIT and Duke University, told ABC News.

“And one could argue that they would be much more environmentally friendly since they could take cars off the road for last mile delivery and help reduce congestion.”

But, if you’re a farmer, your job never got easier.

“Crop dusting is the most dangerous job in general aviation with a high accident rate. Drones cannot only do that job better, but much safer,” said Cummings to ABC News.

Creating a safer world full of unmanned drones, sounds exciting! Or is it?

With any new gadget comes new glitches.

A drone that flew over a Martha Stewart’s farm and took footage is now at the foot of a long lawsuit.

Questions about the right to privacy and sharing airspace are topical today more than ever. It’s so easy with a click of a finger to send an algorithm that will babysit–spy–on your friends, family, colleagues, even competitors.

In the workplace, employers who don’t know the rules for monitoring employees are sitting ducks for lawsuits. In fact, you’ve got some legal leeway to monitor, but it only goes so far before you’ve stepped over the line and sparked a lawsuit.

It’s easy to think you want to keep your “eyes and ears” open with hidden cameras keeping tabs on employees. But, as an employer, you can’t invade employees’ privacy when monitoring email, smart phones, social media, or other technology associated with work.

That means no drones in the boardroom, please.

Missteps can easily occur because technology and the rules surrounding them are evolving rapidly.

To further complicate this already complex issue, you’re also grappling with next-generation issues raised by the use of social media as a business tool and the increasing adoption of “bring-your-own-device” (BYOD) programs. If you allow employees to bring in their own devices, iPads, iPhones, computers, etc., or get on social media, suddenly Discovery for a lawsuit has become invasive and expensive.

Gadgets and devices are portable and affordable these days, which means law firms can’t afford to wait to create internal policies and protocols regarding the use (and abuse) of them.

Is your organization prepared for what’s coming down the pipeline for employee privacy?

Learn more about current strategies and best practices for each emerging trend – especially in legal gray areas, such as:

  • BYOD – bring your own device and the employer’s right to access info on the employee’s own phone
  • Social Media – particularly after hours use that the employer finds and wants to act on
  • GPS Tracking of employees via company phones and company vehicles
  • Hidden Cameras used to monitor employees in the workplace
  • Drones – Bird? Plane? No, it’s your employer and its drone (we’re not kidding).

Attend The Center for Competitive Management (C4CM)’s course, “Employee Privacy and the Complexities of BYOD, Social Media, GPS Tracking & Drones,” on Wednesday, November 5, 2014, from 2 PM To 3:15 PM EST.

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