Tag Archives: communication

Study Shows Lawyers Seen As Competent But Not Trustworthy: How Your Firm Can Get Out Of The Gutter!

Why do so many people hate lawyers?

No, this isn’t another set-up for a lawyer joke. As a legitimate question, Victoria Pynchon for Forbes explains:

“People hate lawyers because they represent the interests of people and corporations without really caring who they are, what they did, what harm they caused, or, how culpable they are.”

The practice of law, rather, legal representation, is a right of American citizens. As such, it seen as a public service. So when powerful men in power suits undermine the “little guy,” people get bitter.

Isn’t the law supposed to be helping the public, not hurting them?

“It’s OK to hate lawyers because the top of the profession—which wields true economic and political power—continues to run its operations as a old boy’s club, making it less diverse than the GOP.”

Well, that explains it then. Or does it?

“As I’ve written before,” continues Pynchon, “cronyism runs law firms. And because cronyism—you scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours—duplicates itself in gender and color, the power in BigLaw is concentrated in the hands of a few white men… And that’s a problem for the rest of us.”

In the end, the bearish reputation of BigLaw dominates the news. So local stories of law firms doing good or pro-bono work for communities take the back burner.

It’s no wonder lawyers remain one of the most reviled professions.

Luckily, attorneys—like misery—have company.

In a recent review, published by the Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), lawyers are viewed as “competent but not trustworthy,” alongside CEOs, Accountants, Researchers, Scientists, and Engineers.

Of course, in this small continuum, attorneys are at the bottom of the scale (see the diagram here—literally at the bottom).

Apparently Americans are wary of a few experts-in-their-fields. The public distinguishes between professional respect and warmth. So, you can be wonderful at your job, but not necessarily a wonderful person (and the reverse, as is the case for child care workers, who are seen as mediocre in competency but high in warmth).

“Scientists have earned the respect of Americans but not necessarily their trust,” explains lead author Susan Fiske, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology and professor of public affairs, according to PhysOrg.

However, there’s hope to improve.

“But this gap can be filled by showing concern for humanity and the environment. Rather than persuading, scientists may better serve citizens by discussing, teaching and sharing information to convey trustworthy intentions.”

The same applies to attorneys. Your social skills may be holding you back, but there are myriad ways to increase that coveted bedside manner.

Here are a few simple things to remember:

  • Don’t do all the talking—work on your listening skills. Clients want to feel heard.
  • Use phrases that convey compassion, like “yes, that must be really hard for you,” or “I understand this is difficult to hear, let me know if you need a minute.”
  • Communicate over the phone or in person—clients value being valued, which means stop dropping cavalier e-mails.
  • Provide solutions—don’t just point out the problems with a person’s case, provide solutions. There’s always a work-around, “Plan B”, or even long-shot to be tried—so try it!

In the end, clients want to see you’re as hopeful of a positive outcome as they are—and not just because of the billable hours.

Need to brush up on some leadership skills? Listen to C4CM’s audio course, “Attentive Listening: Essential Tips and Techniques to Effective Leadership and Overall Success.

Leadership applies not only to your own team, but the team you build with both colleagues and clients.

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Social Media For Law Firms: How To Get Your Content Out There!

So, you’re a law firm manager and you’ve finally got on board with using social media to promote your firm’s services, to evolve with the technological times, and to attract new employees and clients.

Of course, it’s difficult to constantly update your LinkedIn account, Twitter feeds, and blog posts, but you’ve assigned associates for each task and are feeling confident about the endeavor.

The problem is, how do you get people to actually read it?

There are many strategies for increasing the readership of your online legal content—from increasing your number of Twitter followers to increasing the number of website hits by new users.

Here are a few tips on how to get your content shared, and the upsides and downsides of each idea:

1. Publish your posts on media aggregators.

Upside: Websites like Reddit, Shoutwire, and Digg allow individuals to submit links to websites, blog posts, or any Internet-based page. The community of readers then votes up (or down) the link based on a review of its content. Create flashy titles and you’ll likely see in a flash the rise of your readership.

Downside: Comments by readers can be harsh. The anonymity of the Internet allows people to write down criticisms (NSFW) that may end up permanently cached on the World Wide Web.

2. Add website sharing buttons.

Upside: Your firm’s website should have links to all of your social media accounts, as well as ways to share your posts. Programs like “Click to Tweet” make this easy.

Downside: Your firm may need a small amount of Internet savvy to create buttons on your website and restore broken links.

3. Create interesting content.

Upside: This is so obvious your firm is likely already doing it! Nevertheless, remember to write thoughtful arguments accompanied with eye-catching photos. There’s so much competition already when it comes to online content, your firm’s additions must stand out.

Downside: Yes, this requires a little more time and thought to write captivating posts and tweets.

4. Do your research.

Upside: If you know what time your readers are log on then you’ll know the best time to publish your posts. Maybe you’re getting a lot of hits first thing in the morning. People are remiss to start work at 8am and decide to read legal news or browse the web. With this knowledge, you can now set your social media to publish at certain times to target your audience.

Downside: Due diligence on your casework is no longer enough. Time to do due diligence on your business development, too.

5. Crossover multiple social media platforms.

Upside: Happy you finally mastered the art of blogging for your firm? Time to summarize that blog post on your LinkedIn and Facebook page and compile a 140-character hook for your Twitter account. Don’t be afraid to repeat the same ideas on different mediums.

Downside: Now you’ll have to memorize more usernames and passwords. More social media means more potential backlash.

In the end, it’s possible to get your firm’s name and reputation out there.

But, just be careful what your wish for. The New York Police Department (NYPD) recently tried to increase its social media presence to interact with its target audience (“the people”). Instead of wielding the hashtag to promote its officers, however, the NYPD received a top-5 trending Twitter bashtag.

The Assciated Press (via NPR) reports:

“The nation’s largest police force learned the hard way that there are legions online devoted to short-circuiting even the best-intentioned public relations campaign—in this case, the NYPD’s Twitter invitation to people to post feel-good photos of themselves posing with New York’s Finest.

What #myNYPD got instead was a montage of hundreds of news images of baton-wielding cops arresting protesters, pulling suspects by the hair, unleashing pepper spray and taking down a bloodied 84-year-old man for jaywalking.”

So, use the above tips to get your firm’s content shared on social media. Just be sure it’s content that you truly want shared.


The question for organizations is how do you use these tools to open up communications with your workers, candidates and customers, while protecting your reputation as an organization? Attend C4CM’s course, “Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter: Developing a Successful Social Media Employer Branding Strategy.

If you’re looking for tips on communication practices in the workplace, read C4CM’s guide “Communication Skills for Managers: Tips, Techniques, and Best Practice Strategies to Communicate More Effectively.

Applying successful communication techniques gives you two important advantages: 1)You’ll create a harder-working and more productive employee workforce, and 2) you’ll be less likely to fall into the clutches of employee lawsuits.

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A To F: Alphabetical List Of Outdated Legal Technology

We’ve already complained about Luddite lawyers.

Technology is not only a pragmatic requirement of the practice of law; it is now an ethical one, too.

If your IT Department isn’t already the most integral and important part of your firm, it’s like you’re falling behind. Furthermore, if you use any of the following items on a day-to-day basis, it’s like your operations are as outdated, as well.

Eliminate some of these machines and office mores to get back on track.

“A” for Associates.

Associates are on the decline, and law firm employees on the rise.

Associate compensation models are changing as the legal marketplace becomes overpopulated with a generation of lawyers with very different workplace attitudes and expectations.

Firms are recognizing the growing obsolescence of the traditional lockstep model and are taking steps to rework it or replace it. Firms now have an opportunity to be much more creative in how their attorneys are paid and to use compensation as a way to drive long-term value. To create long-term value and retain good attorneys, a firm first needs to design a strong, coherent, and attractive strategy.

Rather than firing secretaries or de-equitizing partners, Greenberg Traurig law firm has created a new strategy for hiring associates in the form of a “residency program.” Firm managers view this program as a way to attract talented associates without having to endure the costly and risky hiring process. Also, it allows junior lawyers to sign on who may not have made the cut in the first place, reports Law21.

In addition, junior lawyers work case matters without billing their work at the high rates clients have come to expect. Sitting on conference calls and gaining on-the-job training, these “resident” attorneys gain the job experience needed to succeed in the future and sustain life in an over-saturated market today.

Greenberg is simultaneously creating a new non-shareholder-track position called the practice group attorney, similar to the positions at law firms Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton; and Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe. 

The age of the Associate is over.

“B” for Binders

Why are you till making copies, printing out transcripts, and creating binders? Sure, every once in awhile, there’s a need for a hard-copy backup binder. But, it’s time to go digital.

Papers can be scanned, digitally stored, text-recognized, and then made searchable to improve the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of your law firm.

Binders are out, and electronic case material software—MyCase, Amicus Attorney, AdvantageLaw, LegalFiles, and OneNote—is in.

“C” for Conference calls

How many people really benefit from conference calls? Already, it’s impossible for more than one person to speak, and—often—people accidentally speak over one another.

Is a conference call more efficient than a memo? Do five people really need to bill the client for the same call?

Conference calls can easily be replaced with a quick person-to-person conversation, memorandums circulated over email, lists distributing work product, or—for the advanced law firm—discussions over a wiki (Learn how to create one here).

Ditch the conference call and develop your social capital at in-person conferences instead.

“D” for Dictaphones

Della may have used a Dictaphone for Perry Mason, but outside the world of black and white television is the real world of iPhones and Macbooks.

Your smartphone, tablet, and computer is capable of recording and even transcribing audio. So why are you still using cassette tape recorders? The Dictaphone should die in a fiery death, the app Dragon Dictation, however, is worth its weight in Silicon.

“E” for E-mail

Experts agree, e-mail is outdated. A meeting-less morning, a conference-call free afternoon, or e-mail-less day goes a long way in productivity for the firm and project deliverables for your clients.

Reading and answering e-mail takes up approximately 28 percent of the average workweek for employees, reports a 2012 study by McKinsey & Company. Communicating and collaborating internally takes up 14 percent of the workweek, and searching and gathering information just 19 percent.

Have you ever e-mailed a colleague who shares a wall with you? If so, it’s time to reconsider your e-mail etiquette and e-mail frequency.

Electronic communication certainly has its advantages. But, its overuse has made e-mail under-perform in comparison to old-fashioned office visits.

“F” for Faxes

Ok, keep your fax machine. But only if it’s paid for or used as a paperweight, museum item, or reminder to what legal assistants had to go through to file motions in the past. Otherwise, stick to e-filings or eFaxing.

If you’re having trouble keeping up with times, just consult The Center For Competitive Management (C4CM)’s list of courses and audio conferences on technology integration for law firms.

Also, keep reading this blog, http://lawfirmsuccess.wordpress.com/, for more tips of the legal trade.

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Tips For Handling Difficult Conversations In The Workplace

There’s a reason this article is about “tips” and not “tricks” for handling difficult conversations in the workplace. It’s because there is no way to avoid important human resources conversations: poor hygiene, denial of a raise or promotion, firing…

Take, for example, the recent layoffs at law firm Arent Fox. The Above the Law Blog reports that the law firm, faced with financial difficulties, has recently fired members of their staff. The law firm issued a statement, saying:

“Effective this week, the firm reduced the number of support staff by approximately 20 people in various offices and departments. Like many firms across the country, we are making hard choices to ensure that our resources are aligned with demand. This was a difficult decision that was made even harder because we are losing good people who have helped make Arent Fox an excellent law firm. Those affected are being provided with severance pay and health benefits. We wish them the best.”

Certainly, firing employees is difficult. But, so is explaining these firing to your clients and other colleagues. Arent Fox did an excellent job discussing this sensitive issue.

Why? They kept it short, honest, timely, contextual, and classy.

In general, the rules—if there are any—for handling difficult conversations are simple.

Be honest.

Being honest involves leaving emotion at the door. Honesty doesn’t mean telling an employee how you really feel: they’re incompetent, lazy, and toxic team member! Honesty involves concrete examples of poor performance, for example, or poor hygiene, if that’s the case.

Don’t hide behind excuses. If you’re firing a person for poor performace, bring up documented instances where that was the case.

In the case of Arent Fox, they admitted that individuals who were laid off had contributed greatly to the firm. Like any company in financial straights, however, there are tough decisions to be made. The statement issued by the firm is thus honest and understandable, although unfortunate.

Be timely.

As a corollary, honesty requires documentation and timely reports.

If you plan on using a complaint by a coworker against one of your subordinates, you need to bring it to their attention immediately. Give the subordinate in question time to defend or correct their behavior.

If you come to them even a week or two later, it’s likely they will simply deny the claim. And, it’ll be too long for you (or them) to truly remember the offense.

If you suspect, as a partner or senior manager, that there will be arbitrary lay-offs in the future, issue a statement alluding to that fact. Nothing is worse than being caught off guard by the financial woes of your employer.

Allow your employees to arrange their affairs in enough time. That way, like at Arendt Fox, employees who were let-go know that they will have severance pay and health benefits, and have hopefully put a job lead or two in order.

Be consistent.

Finally, be consistent in your statements. When faced with difficult conversations, it’s easy to talk in a circle. The important thing is to keep focused on the topic at hand, and to not make contradictory statements.

For example, if you are denying a person’s request for a raise because you don’t have the budget, don’t then promote (with a raise) another colleague. And, if you do, address the situation. Perhaps there’s only room in the budget for one raise, and the other person is more senior or more skilled.

Inconsistency can be interpreted as dishonesty, which—as mentioned earlier—is the easiest way to lose the respect of a subordinate and lose you handle on this difficult conversation.

In the end, there are also emotional and legal ramifications to holding difficult conversations in the workplace.

Read C4CM’s Guide on Handling Difficult Conversations: Communication Strategies for the Workplace to learn more. The 108-page guide provides practical and realistic solutions for tackling the hardest elements of workplace interactions, including:

  • Job Performance
  • Disciplinary Action
  • Termination of Employment
  • Employee Complaints about the Workplace
  • Disabilities (Related to Job Accommodations)
  • Personal Presentation/Hygiene

-WB

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56% Of Consumers Use Social Media To Search For Attorneys

 How Your Firm Can Profit From & Avoid Pitfalls Of Social Media

This Spring, Tumblr hit the 100 Million mark—100 million blogs, that is. If we’re talking about numbers in terms of profit, Tumblr far exceeded mere millions. In May, social blogging platform CEO David Karp sold the company to Yahoo! for a cool $1.1 billion.

Karp, for those who don’t already know, is a 26-year old high school drop out who built Tumblr while still living at his mother’s New York City apartment in 2007, writes Brian Warner for Celebrity Net Worth.

In the same period it can take lawyers to settle a single lawsuit, Karp created and sold a billion-dollar business. If there was ever a time to praise the popularity of social media, Tumblr’s milestone in millions of blogs could certainly serve that purpose.

That’s why it’s not surprising to read in a recent study conducted by The Research Intelligence Group that 56 percent of consumers and 72 percent of minorities who searched for an attorney in the past year reported doing so via social media.

In fact, over one-fifth of survey participants went so far as to consult the social media pages of the specific lawyers or firms that they were considering during this search for legal representation, reports Kevin O’Keefe for Real Lawyers Have Blogs.

Law is a time-honored profession. As such, it maintains certain traditions and history. Ergo, lawyers aren’t often known for being on the cutting edge of technology.

Nevertheless, most law firms today have a website. Keeping that website up-to-date is critical.

Firm websites help you attract more clients, rise in search engine rankings, keep up with technological developments for electronic legal tools, update your firm and practice area information, and increase interaction with the legal community and community of potential clients, in general.

Recently the Virginia Supreme Court in Horace Hunter v. Virginia State Bar ruled on the extent to which law firms can promote their practice and previous legal wins via a blog or website:

“The Virginia majority held that Hunter did not have to seek clients’ permission to discuss past closed cases, even if there was a possibility that the clients would suffer embarrassment or some other harm by the public airing of their affairs. The court also ruled that Hunter’s blogging about past courtroom successes on his firm’s website constituted an advertisement, even though he also included commentary on the criminal justice system. As a result, the majority said he should have included a standard disclaimer cautioning against too much reliance on past results.” (via Above The Law)

Thus, with proper disclaimers, your firm can join the Twittersphere.

In the end, websites, blogs, Twitter, and other social media are not a new development in technology. The Research Intelligence Group’s survey shows that although the number of Internet users declined with age, a surprising 30 percent of survey respondents above the age of 50 were also professed social media users.

And, among survey respondents, nearly one-quarter made a final selection of a lawyer based, in part, on what they gleaned through their social media research, according to Kevin O’Keefe for Real Lawyers Have Blogs.

So, what are a few “must-haves” for attorney websites?

LexisNexis’ own blog suggests:

  • Areas of Law Practiced. Specify your areas of legal expertise and the services that you offer in each of those areas. If visitors can’t find this information quickly, or if it’s unclear, they are likely to leave the site.
  • Experience. Prospective clients want to know how long you have practiced law and whether you have previously handled cases like theirs.
  • Education. Reassure visitors that you have the know-how to resolve their legal issues. Tell them where you went to law school, and when and where you passed the bar exam.
  • Photos. Offer a glimpse of your personality through pictures, but remember to always use professional-looking shots. People who visit your site are searching for an attorney they can trust, not a drinking buddy.
  • Biographical Data. Sharing information about your family and your interests/hobbies conveys personality and helps build connections with potential clients. Just don’t overdo it. (But if your goal is to secure referrals from corporate counsel, our research indicates you should minimize such details.)

However, training your team in technology serves your clients in more ways than one.

In today’s Facebook world, lawyers use social media to attract clients, but they can also have an obligation to perform research on social media sites during investigations, as well.

Social media profiles are a potential treasure trove of information in litigation. But using social networking can ensnare attorneys in ethical traps in two different ways: (1) when accessing information in someone else’s profile, and (2) when an attorney’s own profile information might be used against them.

How can you effectively use social networks to gather information to gain a legal edge while ethically keeping out of trouble?

C4CM’s comprehensive webinar, Using Social Media in Legal Investigations: Traversing the Ethical Minefieldon July 16, 2013, from 2:00 P.M to 3:15 P.M. Eastern time, explores key strategies to improve your legal investigation on social media while keeping yourself safe from legal and ethical pitfalls.

If you’ve found this blog post via social media, you’re off to a great start. Keep up the momentum by exploring other important online tools for law firm managers here.

With so many consumers consulting social media, it’s time for law firm professionals to (*ah hem*) follow suit.

-WB

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The School Of Life (For Lawyers)

If you’re in need of inspiration, simply browse the courses offered by The School of Life. Exactly as it sounds, the school of life provides lessons and seminars to improve your experience as a human being in this world.

But, how about improving your experience as a law firm professional?

If you’re in search to derive meaning from your work, you need only go as far as the calendar for August 2013. It turns out, the School of Life could easily be renamed a School of Life for Lawyers.

The first class offered is How To Be Confident. As a law firm professional, there are three reasons you should be confident.

First, for the employee, you’ll earn more respect in the workplace with confidence in your work product. For associates looking for promotion, it’s far better to stand by your deliverables than to deliver blame when something goes array.

Take ownership of your work and you may one day own the workplace as law firm partner.

Second, confidence translates well into the courtroom. Being prepared is often translated into confidence. Judge and jury will be more apt to believe your story when they think you are confident in what you’re speaking about. This means no hesitation in your speech, consistency in your presentation, knowing your audience, and recovering nimbly in the event of an accidental blunder.

Third, as a law firm manager, confidence brings calm. Whether it’s the anxious client or the terrified first-year attorney, a boss with confidence is one who is heeded. When you’re in a time crunch, appearing frantic and hesitant will relay to your subordinates. If you need your subordinates at work or a client on the stand to be confident, they’ll only learn how by mimicking your own behavior.

The next class offered is How To Find A Job You Love. Ideally, you already love your job. But, if you don’t, learn to make the best of it by seeking out new responsibilities around the office or participating in pro-bono work.

Law firm managers should be especially attentive the level of morale at their firm. Studies show happiness translates into efficiency in any profession.

The third class offered is How To Be Cool.

Cool lawyers spend their lunch hour creatively. That means playing the Lunch Game. Play lunch roulette where once a week law firm professionals are randomly assigned a lunch group. That way, your firm begins to bond at all levels. You’ll be surprised how much your employees will learn about the firm by lunching with a different department.

If that’s not for you, try eating out once a month together. A change in scenery might lead to a change in thinking necessary to crack a case.

Whether it’s dining room DJ booths or levitating workstations, “cool” law firms are also more productive ones. Nothing improves innovation rates like a change of pace and tradition.

Finally, one of the last courses is How To Have Better Conversations.

Learning to talk is not just for toddlers. In fact, having productive conversations is key for law firm professionals. Great leaders are also great conversationalists.

In an interview with Boris Groysberg and Michael Slind, authors of Talk, Inc.: How Trusted Leaders Use Conversation to Power Their Organizations, the ideacast develops the view that Leadership Is a Conversation.

“If you think about what organization is all about, it’s just basically a bunch of conversations that are happening at the same time,” answers Mr. Groysberg.

“What leaders do is facilitate the conversations that actually produce value, that actually engage employees; its what distinguishes some of the best corporations.”

Think about the key elements of what makes interpersonal and productive conversation among friends. These conversations include four elements; they are interactive, intimate, inclusive, and intentional.

“When you place this conversation in an organization, many of these attributes disappear,” laments Mr. Groysberg.

By restoring these four elements of conversation into your everyday workplace dialogue, you will empower yourself as a manager or en envalue yourself as an employee.

In the end, law firm success may not depend on the courses offered at the School of Life. But, reading the titles for such courses provides enough fodder for thought for a lifetime. If your firm lacks confidence, passion, coolness, or productive conversation, it may be time for your profesionals to be re-schooled.

-WB

*Note, this website is in no way affiliated with The School of Life, nor is it promoting any of the SoL’s course offerings.

C4CM does, however, offer its own selection of valuable courses for life and lawyers, including:

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How To Handle Needy Clients (& Still Get Work Done!)

Whether you’re practicing in large corporate firm or small mom-and-pop shop, as an attorney, you’ll keep facing the same issue: lengthy client consultation.

It may be in-person or over the phone, but lengthy client conversations happen, and they cost your firm money. Unfortunately, you can’t always bill these consultations as a client call.

In fact, keeping up with the issues your clients face is part of the job. It’s important to address client concerns, lay out case timetables, and explain the legal process. However, clients often can’t tell the difference between a legal issue and one, well, for a different type of professional—the psychiatrist.

“Clients want to talk about things that have nothing to do with the legal work I have to do. They ask the same questions that you can’t answer: ‘When will this be over?’ or, ‘Do you think (this) will happen?’ You’re tired of telling the client, ‘I don’t know, but just be patient.’ The client calls and says he “read” this, or “heard” this,’ or worse, ‘My friend had a case like this and…’” recalls Brian Tannebaum in his Above The Law article, “Strengthening the Attorney/Client Relationship.”

The problem is, law is personal.

For the small-business owner faced with the risk of losing his legacy, successfully passing on a business to his children that he built for decades from the ground up is no small issue at all. The woman filing for divorce or fighting for custody of children is understandably emotional. Imprisonment or freedom is, for many, a choice between life or death.

Everyday occurrences for attorneys are special occasions—and mostly stressful ones—for clients. Nevertheless, attorneys can’t play therapist to every needy client.

So how can you avoid unnecessarily long client consultations? Try empowering your assistant.

Train your assistant to handle those difficult client calls. For example, a legal assistant should understand the legal process and be aware of specific case updates or news to answer most client questions. He or she can certainly learn to disarm angry clients or soothe anxious ones.

Make sure it doesn’t seem like you are dismissing your clients. For example, don’t use phrases like “let me hand you to my assistant.” Instead, say things like “Mary handles your invoices,” or “John is really the person you should speak to…”

Get in the habit of handing off certain business or client calls to your assistant, that way your clients are comfortable hear his or her voice.

More than that, make sure your clients are aware of your assistant’s extensive expertise. Assistants come in all shapes and sizes. Because of the technical and complicated nature of law, legal assistants stand apart in specialization and certification.

Not to mention the billable hour of your assistant is less cumbersome than senior partner time.

When you have particularly needy clients, don’t shirk their calls. Due diligence involves, sometimes, a bit of handholding. Give your assistant a quick brief about the specific needs of your client, and have them handle status update phone calls or emails. Your assistant should always keep a tone of confidence and authority.

The idea is to empower your assistant, not enfeeble your clients.

Assistants shouldn’t, obviously, handle all communication. But, to keep up with the demands of your practice, there’s nothing wrong with managing the time of your clients and your staff more efficiently.

With this in mind, make sure you hire an experienced and knowledgeable legal assistant. With so many lawyers and legal professionals out of work, there’s labor-lost when it comes to hiring the right man or woman for the job. Consider looking for a person with a psychology background, as that’s the role they frequently play.

Start by writing a job description for the ideal candidate. Then, include adequate training that should include, for example, client interaction guidelines.

Boost the attorney-client relationship at your firm by not actually handling the relationship, yourself.

-WB

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